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Dutch

Almost got sucked into an FDT

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Dutch
Haven’t yet found an RBT that suits me for my “blade” tractor. So, I bought an original and complete B-110. I was going to attach my blades and surprise you guys. You would have had fun twisting my tail about using an FDT. But, that’s not going to happen. I didn’t mind removing the hood to install a battery, nor did I mind the thought of not having a dipstick to check the oil. The fact that I had to use an offset screwdriver to install new points was slightly annoying. Looking at the accumulation of acorns and leaves on top of the enclosed frame concerned me for future maintenance. After I did a complete lubrication, changed the oil, installed a new plug and points, I took the yellow dog for a test drive. The steering wheel wouldn’t turn more than 180 degrees in either direction. Looked underneath to see what was happening. All I could see was the pitman arm. I was shocked when I looked at the repair manual. Half the tractor has to be disassembled to get to the steering. That’s NOT for me. I’ve been spoiled by the ease of working on RBT’s. Scratch one B-110. It’s going to become a parts donor. Maybe you diehard FDT fans should buy an RBT and remove the running boards if those bother you. After working on an RBT, you’d never go back.

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UCD
Dutch The wife says you shouldn't give up so easy. She says from what she has heard me say about you is That you love a chalange And that you wouldn't let a pile of steel get the best of you.

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arjr111
Dutch, the FD's, can be a pain to work on. Like you said everything has to come off to get to the parts....and then you have to locate the parts. Other than the fact that they are old, and built well, look neat and should be preserved, they really can't be compared to FDT's. Of course, (with all the rain, the soil around here has compacted), I just re-tilled my garden, with the early B10, and it did a great job.

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Kent
Why did you need an offset screwdriver to get to the points? They should readily accessible between the grille frame and the carb... though I find adjusting them to be a pain.... [img]http://simpletractors.com/images/2_into_1/carb_dash.jpg[/img]

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Leroy
quote:
Originally posted by dutch
Haven’t yet found an RBT that suits me for my “blade” tractor. So, I bought an original and complete B-110. I was going to attach my blades and surprise you guys. You would have had fun twisting my tail about using an FDT. But, that’s not going to happen. ------------------------------------------------------ I'm going to learn something new to me. Whats and RBT? I know that FTD is a florist But Whats a FDT? ------------------------------------------------------ I didn’t mind removing the hood to install a battery, nor did I mind the thought of not having a dipstick to check the oil. The fact that I had to use an offset screwdriver to install new points was slightly annoying. Looking at the accumulation of acorns and leaves on top of the enclosed frame concerned me for future maintenance. After I did a complete lubrication, changed the oil, installed a new plug and points, I took the yellow dog for a test drive. The steering wheel wouldn’t turn more than 180 degrees in either direction. Looked underneath to see what was happening. All I could see was the pitman arm. ---------------------------------------------------------------- That Tractor must have a gearbox for the stearing. The rack and pinion type I have would run out of rack before 180 was reached. ---------------------------------------------------------------- I was shocked when I looked at the repair manual. Half the tractor has to be disassembled to get to the steering. That’s NOT for me. I’ve been spoiled by the ease of working on RBT’s. Scratch one B-110. It’s going to become a parts donor. Maybe you diehard FDT fans should buy an RBT and remove the running boards if those bother you. After working on an RBT, you’d never go back.
Dutch is spoiled? Sounds like you have the job understood and that is half the battle.

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Kent
Sorry, Dutch, I just realized that I used a long screwdriver through the grille on the Big Ten to adjust the points and you can't do that on the B-110, since the screwdriver won't go through the grille mesh.... Dang CRS!

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vfd702
Dutch...I am so proud of you ! It's just an RBT thing...they just don't understand. I always enjoy it when I get on my RBT's after tilling with my 101. SO MUCH ROOM ! ken

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Dutch
quote:
Originally posted by Kent
Sorry, Dutch, I just realized that I used a long screwdriver through the grille on the Big Ten to adjust the points and you can't do that on the B-110, since the screwdriver won't go through the grille mesh.... Dang CRS!
The adjustment screw is easy to reach, it's the screw that holds the wires (condenser & mag) that requires an offset screwdriver. In fact, that may be the reason the owner sold the tractor. That screw was loose and it had no spark. He probably thought he needed to pull the engine and replace the armature.

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Dutch
quote:
Originally posted by UCD
Dutch The wife says you shouldn't give up so easy. She says from what she has heard me say about you is That you love a chalange And that you wouldn't let a pile of steel get the best of you.
It's not going to get the best of me. I could think and think and make modifications and improvements, and when I was all done I'd have an RBT. Why reinvent the wheel?

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Dutch
quote:
Originally posted by arjr111
Dutch, the FD's, can be a pain to work on. Like you said everything has to come off to get to the parts....and then you have to locate the parts.
Not exactly........ They (the FDT owners) have to do the work and locate the parts. I ain't going to be one of yous guys.

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Nick
Wouldn't mind having a second B-110... I still got to get to the steering on mine, The only way I can turn the wheels if I disconnect the arm. What a pain the ass some of the bolts have been. Especially the seat bolts I loosened them but they keep freewheeling in BOTH directions. I can't even tighten down enough to get them to snap. I also can't figure out why they decided to use square nuts I can't even use a combo wrench on the one end, and a 7/16 socket on the other. I have to use vise grips which keep slipping.

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arjr111
quote:
Especially the seat bolts I loosened them but they keep freewheeling in BOTH directions.
Nick, they use the T-nuts to grab into the wood, so you can tighten down on them, and keep the seat from loosening. Once the wood softens up with age, and the T-nuts get a little rusty from condensation, then if you put a wrench to them, they break loose from the wood and turn. The only way to get them out is to rip apart the seat. [url]http://www.geocities.com/arjr111/photopagespiral.html[/url] Then you need to replace it, at about $80+shipping. I agree it is a pain, especially if you had hoped to save the seat. And, the fuel tank will probably have pin holes in it. And the steering is hard to get to, (then you need to find parts). The Carbs. are almost impossible to get apart after they have been crusted up by age and neglect. BGB's must be checked. You really gotta like oldies, or it can get frustrating!

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Dutch
quote:
Originally posted by Kent
What do you want for the B-110? It sounds like it needs someone who'll appreciate it... ;)
Too late........... I took it apart last night, and it made me feel good.:D}:) If the engine doesn't sell on eBay, I'll put it in a 7010 "junker" I already own.

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Chris727
I have 3 large frame tractors, a B-110 my main user and two non running RBT's 3410 and 7013. Guess I need to get one of the RBT's running to know what all the hype is about, for now I love the B-110, I get complements and offers on it all the time and its not even restored. -Chris

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samson
I love my B10 @ B12 What ever it takes to fix it so be it. The steering really isn't that difficult to work on, IF!!! you read the instructions. Let me know if your getting rid of it. Just like camels I'd walk a mile for it.

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dieselman
them wheel horse fdt sure are nice. we have one and i love it. Expct that time that i was disking corn stalks with it and got my leg cought on a corn stalk and about broke my leg.

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G.Kiebler
We should be thankful the fdt's sold so well;if it weren't for that you rbt fans would be non-existant. I still luv the fdt's even if they can be a little challenging to work on.I equate them to old mustangs,they just weren't the same after 1970.

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Nick
quote:
Originally posted by arjr111
quote:
Especially the seat bolts I loosened them but they keep freewheeling in BOTH directions.
Nick, they use the T-nuts to grab into the wood, so you can tighten down on them, and keep the seat from loosening. Once the wood softens up with age, and the T-nuts get a little rusty from condensation, then if you put a wrench to them, they break loose from the wood and turn. The only way to get them out is to rip apart the seat. [url]http://www.geocities.com/arjr111/photopagespiral.html[/url] Then you need to replace it, at about $80+shipping. I agree it is a pain, especially if you had hoped to save the seat. And, the fuel tank will probably have pin holes in it. And the steering is hard to get to, (then you need to find parts). The Carbs. are almost impossible to get apart after they have been crusted up by age and neglect. BGB's must be checked. You really gotta like oldies, or it can get frustrating!
I planned on replacing the seat anyway so no big deal. The carb is working order, which is good. The fuel tank had no pin holes but has bits of surface rust inside. Some of the steering parts, I haven't oiled yet, as I still have to take off the body. No big deal, as I need to clean the area of Debris anyway and also need to repaint those parts of the tractor. I work on the tractor either if I have the time or am in the mood.

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Kent
quote:
And the steering is hard to get to, (then you need to find parts).
I just researched the parts for these a few weeks back -- you can get every part to rebuild the steering gear setup with one exception, but I can't remember what it was... Every other part number was still available. The small gear (and its bushing) that goes on the eccentric post at the bottom of the steering shaft is about $56 though, as I recall... and the "pie-shaped" gear is close to $30. It would have been easily a $100 venture to completely rebuild it, so I scavenged a used one and installed that.

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