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Dave-Saratoga

mounting new tires

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Dave-Saratoga
just wondering, does $124 seem a bit pricey to mount 4 new tires onto rims that do not already have tires on them. This price also include 2 tubes for the rear tires at a cost of $19 each. This Simplicity (and John Deere) dealer claims it took 1.6 hrs at $45 per hour.

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Bunky
I bought one of those mini Tire changer's from Harbor Freight... It Seems to work better then I figured it would It seems kind of High priced to me But I'm not sure.....

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srwven
I took a pair of rear tires for my 7014 that had turf tires on them to be taken off and replaced with ag tires(with tubes) to my local tire shop. I think they charged me like $15 to take off the old tires and mount the new tires/rims. Sounds like you got ripped.

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Dave-Saratoga
it works out to about $18 per tire, which is high then add in the price i was charged for the tubes- all from a dealer that i have been waiting for 2-1/2 weeks for about $125 worth of other parts from simplicity. think i'll be visiting ed's small engine site for my next order.

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Charlieson
Did the price include fluid? I bought two ag lug tires from the local tire dealer (carlisle), had fluid put in them. The tires were 59.00/piece. I was charged 34.00 for 30 gallons of antifreeze (no way the tires could hold 15 gallons/piece) and then 12.00 to mount them. Total bill 191.00.

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Kent
I've been paying $12 each to have rears mounted tubeless, including valve stem. I've been mounting the fronts myself, once I discovered how easy it is... Haven't bought a rear tube lately, but the last 4.80 x 8 tube I bought individually was $9.00...

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Ishmael2k
Sounds very high to me. I had two rears mounted on empty rims and my local shop charged me $10 for the pair. Took them about 5-7 minutes each. I'd look for a different dealer. On another note I saw a neat bead breaker at another shop, it is a slide hammer with the end shaped to fit in between the tire and rim. It was about 5 foot long and the guy dropped the hammer once or twice per tire and it was broke loose. (On old rear tires at that.) I am going to look into getting one.

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UCD
They should have been able to mount 4 new tractor tires on new wheels in 30 min or less. I used to take 4 tires off from a car/pickup dismount, clean the rim, new valve stems and remount & balance and back on the car in 40 min. Tubes are no harder. How many coffee brakes?

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HubbardRA
I just bought a full size tire changer for $29.95 from a Chuck Homier tool sale. Looks like it will be great for garden tractor tires as well as trailer and car tires. I know it will mount and unmount them, since I usually do that with screwdrivers, prybars, and a hammer, but I am wondering about the device for unseating the beads. Just doesn't look like you have enough force to do the job.

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thedaddycat
I got a tire changer fron Harbor Freight(I think) that does the job fairly easily unless the tire is rusted onto the rim. Then it takes a bit more work. The only down side is that you have to remove the inner races from the front wheels since they won't fit over the center post with the races installed. A big hammer and drift punch makes short work of that though. Maybe I'll get a Mini-changer just to do fronts without having to remove the races..... BTW, I mounted the changer to an oak pallet so it's stable yet portable. Believe me, when I stand on that thing it ain't going anywhere..... LOL

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Dadsy98
I've used the full size tire changer from Harbor Freight to remove two old rear 23" tires. It broke the bead easily on both tires. Time it took for both dismounts was only twenty minutes or so. After I had the tires off I found the previous owner had used tar, glue, and other substances to seal the bead. Used a grinder to take most of it off. The rims are now blasted and primed. just need a rattle can of almond to finish them. Steve

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cougar
I own and use both the mini tire changer and the large tire charger. I have never had to much problem breaking the beads even with them rusted to the rim. I use dishsoap to lube the tire both in getting the tire on and off. The hard part to me is to get the rear tire to set the beads. To do this I put a strap with rachet down the center of the tire and tighen it has much as possible. As soon as the beads set release the strap with caution since strap is under extreme tension

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dtsr
That is a bit pricey. I bought the small tire changer from Northern Tools and it works really good. Just make sure you have it mounted on a secure surface. I have mine mounted on a work bench and take my time going around the wheel with the breaker bar taking a little each time.

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HubbardRA
The changer I just bought from Homier is identical to the one Steve pictured above, except painted black. I'll probably try it for the first time this weekend. I hadn't even thought about the center hole being a problem on the fronts. Guess I'll have to make my own mounting rig for front tires.

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Ishmael2k
The pic in dadsy98's reply shows the bead breaker I saw. I am going to order one this week. Really does work well, I have a set of flat bars made to remove the tires once the bead is broke so I figure I am set.

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Scott Salmons
I've broke stubborn beads loose by laying the tire flat then place a length of board on it with the edge as close to the bead as possible, this will make a ramp that you can drive another tractor (come on everone has more than one) or even a car. Scott Salmons

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