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Nick

Here are the B-110 photos I promised

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Nick
Here are the photos of the B-110 that I promised. :D] I tried to get the two bottom bolts that hold the frame to the BGB with no success. They appear to be rounded off already, but I'm not so sure. From all those leaves sitting in there, The washers seem to weld themselves to the bolt, which makes it very hard to get a socket on it. When you do get the socket on straight, and then proceed to loosen it, the socket pushes it self to the side, and you cannot enough torque on it. [img]/club2/attach/NickStanchak/Rollingchasis.jpg[/img] This photo is of the two side panels ready to be stripped of their paint. Hopefully, I'll get them primed, so no surface rust shows up. I'll worry about bondoing the pitting later. [img]/club2/attach/NickStanchak/paintremove1.jpg[/img] All done! The can said let the stripper set for 10 minutes. I let it sit for 5, and when I returned the stripper was completely dry. Maybe because it is 88 degrees out? I then decided to dip the steel wool into the stripper, and then rubbed all the paint off. How did I do? [img]/club2/attach/NickStanchak/paintremove2.jpg[/img] Sometimes I get fed up with the tractor, and just don't feel like restoring it anymore. I then come to this website, and check out all of the members restored tractors. It helps me get motivated to keep going.

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Tom_Byrne
Looks Good! If the metal is not too badly pitted, try using a "filling primer". I had pretty good luck with it. Didn't want to use bondo because of all the bumps and rattling a tractor gets... I was afraid it would pop out on me. I'm also not very fussy about a few pits; everyone is different. KEEP ON KEEPIN ON!

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DavidG
The Sheet metal you stripped looks pretty good. What you might try after you have sanded or stripped everything , is to use some OxiSolv on the rusty parts before you prime and paint. It's available from Eastwood supply. Chemically turns the rust to zinc phosphate (i think). I'm using it on my B-10 I'm restoring , and none of the rust is showing thru or coming back. Also.. Don't get to discouraged if restoring this takes awhile . Just take your time and just keep plugging along.

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Bunky
don't get frustrated it will take time but it will be worth it everytime someone tells you how nice it looks.. I started on an Allis Chalmers B farm tractor, Said I was just gonna do a quick job, well pretty soon it was all in pieces.. I thought the same thing... Then I just stuck it out and got it finished and couldn't beleive the compliments I got....

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pacodiablo
quote:
Originally posted by Tom_Byrne
Looks Good! If the metal is not too badly pitted, try using a "filling primer". I had pretty good luck with it. Didn't want to use bondo because of all the bumps and rattling a tractor gets... I was afraid it would pop out on me. I'm also not very fussy about a few pits; everyone is different. KEEP ON KEEPIN ON!
You could try filling it with JB Weld. That stuff stays.

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pacodiablo
I may try body filler on my tractor. Rust penetrated the area where the grill bolts to the frame. The previous owner welded it right to the frame - bad idea - I do not have the capability to weld, so I cut new alunimum sections out of sheet alunimum and JB welded them into place, it is strong, but not too even, so I may just cut out the areas where rust penetrated and use Bondo so that everything is even.

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pacodiablo
quote:
Sometimes I get fed up with the tractor, and just don't feel like restoring it anymore. I then come to this website, and check out all of the members restored tractors. It helps me get motivated to keep going.[/font=Comic Sans MS]
I know the feeling. The MTD had a rough life before me. It is a mess and sometimes it seems worthless. Why spend the time to fix that old generic heap? But then I remember how much effort I have put into it, how much time, money and sweat has gone into it and I get back to work. Sometimes I think it is not worth it, I do not have the money for this, but then, instead of scrapping it, I just put it under the cover to work on another day when I have the resources and spend the rest of my time studying up on the tractor. Sometimes I feel rediculous spending this much time on an MTD of all things, but why not? Maybe it will come out better than it started...and that is enough for me.

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MDB
Hang in there Nick, I know it's alot of work, I am working on two restorations right now and sometimes I get frustrated and have to let them set for a while. but it sure is worth it when they are all done...8D^

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thedaddycat
Consider it "practice" for when you get one you really want to do a top notch job on..... After all, everyone who has done restorations has had to do a "first" one at one point.

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Nick
Thanks for the encouragement everyone I need it. I sent the photos to the daughter of the guy who gave me the tractor. She said, "When the time comes that I get done with the tractor, my father probably won't recognize it." I painted the front left rim, in Rust Oleum's brand Painters Touch in the color Navaho white. It is like almond, but a little lighter. At first I didn't care for the way it looked on the rims, but now it looks all right. I also picked up a can of Rust Oleum's high heat barbecue paint, the can says it is satin, but after doing a test area on the engine it looks more like flat black, which I don't care for.

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thedaddycat
Try Color Place (Wal Mart brand) Rust Prevent Satin black. It seems to give a decent coat that's not too flat nor too glossy. I have not run the engine I used it on yet, but have used it on a tranny and it came out good and is holding up well.

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jkmustang1
Nick great looking parts the pics finaly came through keep going. It took four years and alot of sweat hours to rebuild my wrecked car years back but it was alot more screwed than your tractor. From what I've seen so far you have a good start on a great tractor.

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stormy2163
Looks good to me.Keep up the good work. "If you beleive in yourself and have dedication and pride- and never quit,you'll be a winner.The price of victory is high-but so are the rewards". -Paul"Bear"Bryant

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JBLACK
If I may make a suggestion, before you fill the holes in with bondo , put a thin layer of dura glass or aluma lead on first this will protect it from moisture then finish with bondo .The duro glass is like a fiberglass based bondo it doesn`t finish as nice as bondo the aluma lead is a powdered aluminum that you mix with a hardner also and it can be roughed out with a file looks similar to the old body leading when worked correctly. just my 2cents John

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ReedS
Nick I have a 700 that I've had for 4 or 5 years that needs lots of tlc. It hasn't run for at least 3 years....only this winter did I finally find the parts I needed to start restoring it. It is completely diassembled, 2/3 sand blasted and primed, waiting for more time to complete. Have patientence it takes oodles of time to undo 30 or 40 years of wear and tear. Good luck!

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Nick
quote:
Originally posted by vfd702
Did you try a 6 point socket on those bolts on the BGB? ken
Yes I did. They are the only ones I own. I am starting to become annoyed with these bolts. I filed down the sides of the bolts to make them flater. I even tried to tighten them with a 6 point socket to try to break them. I still can't get a good grip on them for some reason.

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rokon2813
Other than heat, if you havent tried already see if you can get a hold of a Snap-on flank drive six point. I use them on rusted manifold studs on cars and they don't slip.

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Nick
quote:
Originally posted by HubbardRA
Nick, I used the Navajho White on the wheels of my AC712S. It looks great with the all orange tractor, and appears much cleaner than pure white.
It does appear much cleaner then the gloss white. I compared the Navaho white to the Rust Oleum almond, and it looks almost identical.

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Nick
quote:
Originally posted by rokon2813
Other than heat, if you havent tried already see if you can get a hold of a Snap-on flank drive six point. I use them on rusted manifold studs on cars and they don't slip.
Dan, I'll ask a few people to see if they have one.

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