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restoring 66 landlord 101


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I am the owner of a 66 landlord 101 (without hydrolift)purchased new by my grandfather that year. I also have quite a variety of attachments and accessories including two sickle bars, two rototillers, a disc harrow, a cultivator, a moldboard plow, rear and front counterweights, manuals for most implements stated, an ad or two, and even a can of touch up paint (original 67 or so), and also a brand new set of teeth for the sickle. My goal is to restore, eventually, the tractor and implements to new condition as a family heirloom. There is a picture I have of me as a baby riding on my grandfathers lap on this machine, and I would like to have my grandchildren's pictures on it as well. I have several questions as far as paint scheme, where I can obtain decals for the implements and the tractor, and whether or not I can still get parts from Simplicity to fit my implements and/or machine. If anyone could help or give me any ideas on painting and restoring, or any constructive comments I would appreciate it.
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1. Start accumulating any parts manuals that you may not have... Simplicity normally stocks publications back 30 years, so you can't get them there, I don't think. You'll likely need the part number for the dealers to cross-reference, making eveyones life easier. Many parts for the tractor, at least, are still available through the dealer network. The same should be true for the Simplicity manufactured attachments.... 2. Reproduction decals for the tractor, at least, are available from Uncle Bob Winter and other sources (see the page in the Part& Manuals section). New decals are NOT available from Simplicity. Simplicity refers people to this site, since decals only have a "shelf life" of about 5-7 years at most -- they get brittle with age... 3. Hold on to your extra sickles, and any sickle bar parts, since Haban (the manufacturer) is now out of business, I think. 4. Make sure you can get the needed parts or decals before you start restoring each piece -- it might impact whether/how you "attack" the task. For example, it may be better to mask off and protect a damaged decal rather than find out too late that you can't get new ones... Duct tape used instead of masking tape will really protect them during sanding -- IF you're VERY careful removing the duct tape. I've even masked with duct tape and sucessfully sandblasted near (not directly on) delicate things like this. "Goo Gone" will remove the sticky residue of duct tape.... 5. Sandblast only if absolutely necessary, since it pits the metal. Use sandpaper (and rust converter -- used to be called Extend, now a Rustoleum product whose specific name I can't remember) instead, on heavily rusted areas. If using rust converter, do NOT remove ALL the rust, only the loose scaly/flaky stuff. After it dries, you can prime and sand over the rust converter. Keep adding more primer, and sanding with progressively finer sandpaper until you have a smooth finish to paint. Note that this experience is from old VWs where rusty floor pans and such were the norm.... 6. Paint shouldn't be an issue, especially since you have original touchup paint that any good automotive paint store should be able to match. Just some quick thoughts, as I wait for an update to the web site to publish. I'm sure others can add more specific experience with these old tractors....
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Thanks Kent, I really appreciate the pointers. I had planned to attack it just as you said, making darn SURE i didnt mess up anything irreplaceable. Thanks again, you've given me a lot of useful info.
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