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simplicity707

old barns

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simplicity707
hey guys, just been on vacation in Wisconsin. On the way I noticed how many old barns were around and that looked abondoned. Call me a snoop, but I would love to go in some of the old barns, and find a lot of neat stuff in them. Well for example, I found my '67 Simplicity Broadmoor 707 sitting in some guys barn, brought it home change the battery and gas, fired right up! Now for your opinons, What have you guys found in the old barns? I'm probably missing out on some great deals, so if you don't mind, i'd like to know what you guys come across in old barns. Thanx,,

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Boney
Massachusetts liscence plate from 1915, no OPE,,,,,yet :) people around here get a little upset when you go poking around in there stuff. I have only gone in 2, got owners permission both times

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srwven
Yeah, I would say that's a good way to get shot.

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ikipp
Yeah. Old barns are beautiful to look at. They make a great photo opportunity.

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johnmonkey
With permission I removed a barn (for the lumber) most of the siding had been removed and all that was left was the framing. The barn was a 33' X 80' tobacco barn. I used it to build my shop. The neatest things in the barn were two wooden "burdens" they are used to bale tobacco together so that it may be brought to market in large 200-300 lb bales. They are about 4' square and are now placed on my shop as a decoration. JH

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Allis_B12
My cousin's farm has an old machinery shed with an unrestored AC B-10 sitting in it. The only things stopping me from taking it home are my parents and the fact that I'd have to rebuild the engine.

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Woodydel
I have always had a hard time snooping in another person's building. It's like an invisible barrier is keeping me out. I will, however, peek from the road looking for tractors. Years ago I approached a local farmer, Ronnie Joseph, asking permission for my family to ride our horses on his land. He said nobody had ever done that before. Usually, he said, they just blast through the fields with their dirt bikes and quads damaging the crops. I always appreciated his giving permission to do so. It's always best to ask. Be prepared to receive a negative response now and again.

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Nick
My neighbors barn is roughly 25x30 and 20 feet tall, It was relocated from it's original site to it's present site in the 1950s. It has one garage door, that is level with the ground, but the right side is there is a hill, Like Kent's (see Kent's review of the Johnny Bucket, His barn is very similar to my neighbors) He also has storage space underneath. The only way you could tell it was relocated is the cinder block foundation. His father found a ton of antique tools in the barn when they moved it. The neighbor recently sold all of them at auction and netted $2500. [img]/club2/attach/NickStanchak/grandpasbarn1.jpg[/img] I would love to have a barn, we have the room for it, but my parents don't want one. maybe one day if I decide to purchase the house from them.

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Ryan
I like old barns. Ohio has grant money to restore old barns, though a lot of people do not know that. My barn is 36x63 and 40' tall with an attached 36x73 lofing shed. It also has a leanto and a corn crib.

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simplicity707
tomorrow, i'm going to help my grandpa tear down an wood shed. it's pretty big, and inside is a john deere 56?? sitting in there. it hasent for 12-13 years. it has a blown engine thats why it's in there. he saids it's mine. now i have to replace the engine and see if i can get it so someone can drive it. i don't whats there. have to take a closer look tomorrow! thanx,,

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KSever
Talk about old barn's in Wisconsin, I just purchased this property with this old barn on it. Plan on restoring what I can. The black spots in the picture on the barn are where the yellow paint has fallen off. But due to the lead base paint on the barn nobody has done any repairs. The roof has been replaced already. I will advise you though. DO NOT come snooping around my barn;) [img]http://listings.eracountryland.com/listpics/330934-4.jpg[/img]

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Ryan
Pretty neat looking barn.

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Kent
I'd let you snoop around my barn, if you'd help me jack it up and fix a settling problem that I have...:( This one is post and beam construction, with mortised joints and dowel pins, build in the late 1850's. The siding is tongue and groove put on with cut nails... but it needs some work... The sill is broken where the "ell" comes off on the right side, and a main post goes up to the roof beams. I need to jack it, reinforce that sill, and replace the post underneath the sill.... Just one more thing on the never-ending list... [img]http://www.simpletractors.com/images/bucket/out_of_woods.jpg[/img]

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quote:
I have always had a hard time snooping in another person's building. It's like an invisible barrier is keeping me out. I will, however, peek from the road looking for tractors. Years ago I approached a local farmer, Ronnie Joseph, asking permission for my family to ride our horses on his land. He said nobody had ever done that before. Usually, he said, they just blast through the fields with their dirt bikes and quads damaging the crops. I always appreciated his giving permission to do so. It's always best to ask. Be prepared to receive a negative response now and again.
Thats great Woody I wish more folks would act this way.
quote:
But due to the lead base paint on the barn nobody has done any repairs. The roof has been replaced already.
Kris last year at the county fair I heard a guy say that he had "the Amish" fix his barn...evidently they came through here last year and do that kind of thing...anyone hear or know more????? Doug

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Ryan
I live right in the middle of Amish country. They fix barns, build houses and do just about anything along as it is not in town. The Amish who did most of my work killed himself earlier this summer with a shotgun blast to the head. He liked to drink a lot of beer and was in big trouble with his ordinum. Henry is sadley missed. Well anyway, they all do pretty good work and love to work on barns.

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Nick
quote:
Originally posted by Kent
I'd let you snoop around my barn, if you'd help me jack it up and fix a settling problem that I have...:( This one is post and beam construction, with mortised joints and dowel pins, build in the late 1850's. The siding is tongue and groove put on with cut nails... but it needs some work... The sill is broken where the "ell" comes off on the right side, and a main post goes up to the roof beams. I need to jack it, reinforce that sill, and replace the post underneath the sill.... Just one more thing on the never-ending list...
Kent, I was wondering if you could post some photos of how the hill came out. sort of an update to the Johnny Bucket story. The only other differences with the barn, is he doesn't have that addition on the back, (I assume it is) and It's covered with that old green tar paper siding, His barn is sinking to, in the middle. He has to jack it up, pour a footing, and put a cinderblock column underneath. It also was built during the same time period. I just found out it was originally located across the street from me.

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Kent
The "ell" is original, as far as I can tell. It has the same construction, and the main sill that is broken is actually at a "+" joint where the "ell" meets the main frame of the barn. Settling has cracked the mortise joint where the right sill for the "ell" is mortised into the mail sill that runs across the length of the barn. I'm thinking of having a thick steel plate made in a "+" shape that I can use to tie that joint together, once I get it jacked and levelled. Interestingly, the second floor of the barn is suspended from a pair of beams in the center of the barn. They are mortised into the center post on each side, and form a "^" a few feet below the rafters. A 1" threaded rod runs down from it to a cross-beam, just above head level, and another 1" threaded rod goes down from it to hold a beam that supports the denter of the second floor.... there's no center post or stud wall in the center of the barn at all... I'll try to get some updates on the hillside. I had a pretty good stand of grass on it last year, but erosion and tire tracks from mowing has it in pretty sad shape now. There's so little topsoil, I don't think I'll ever get a good sod of grass there. So, I started plugging vinca (periwinkle) ground cover into to to see if that will work... if so, I'll proabaly do the whole slope with it...

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