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JCS

Windshield Washer Fluid?

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JCS
I think I saw it here once and just again on YTMAG. Can you really use washer fluid in tires for weight??? Will it freeze?? It should not rust the rims if it leaks right? Way isn't this used more oftern, what are the drawbacks? Would this be better and adding rear wheel weights every winter? Would this mean less weight on the AXLE TUBE is this seems to be a big bad problem spot?

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JB
Hi, It works well and can be put in tubless. It doesn't seem to have any rusting effect and doesn't freeze in most climates. maybe below -30 or so it might. It works so much better than calcium chloride that is used in farm equipment tires. It must be used in tubes and causes the rims to rust badly. It is a form of salt, and does have one advantage in that it weighs more than windshield washer fluid. That is the only advantage. A tire should only be filled to the valve stem with the tire valve at the 12:00 o-clock position. The air in the top is needed for compression, otherwise the tire would be hard as a rock. The fluid can be put in by breaking the bead and pouring it in and then re-inflating the tire, stand it up and make sure to let any fluid above the valve blow out. The tires will not "squish" as much, for example the lower tire when going on a sidehill because the amount of compressable air is replaced with non-compressable fluid and the weight lays right on the bottom of the tread. It works well with wheel weights also. I used to use anti-freeze, [ethelyene glycol]and water 50/50. I discovered it would cause the tires to distort and "gourd" after a few years. After the Sun-runners came out in the early eighties their traction needed improvement. Simplicity recommended using windshield washer fluid, and we have used it ever since with no problems. It doesn't hurt the paint on the rims as it doesn't hurt the paint on a car. Good luck, Al

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StanS
I've been using it (WINTER windshield wash) in the '59 Country Squire for about 7 yrs and this is the first winter for my new '73 4040. Cousin Stubby, a few miles north of St. Johnsbury, Vt., has been using it for umpteen years, and his boys (a farming family) for a half of umpteen. No complaints. Stan PS Thanks Kent, I got my name & add. back.

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paull
Gadgits & Gizmos abound for filling and venting thru the valve stem. I did mine by stuffing an oxygen tube in each stem (with valves removed), connecting the tubes with a 'Y' then a 3d tube into the drilled (2 holes) cap of the gallon container sitting on the seat. A low pressure shot of air into the 2d hole starts the siphon. Air excapes around the threads (usually). Go away for while then return to switch jugs and cap for round 2. Stems should be in the 12 o'clock position. Fill only to the stem. Don't forget - the remaining air space gets ONLY 10 lbs of air. Should air not excape around the threads and the siphon stops simply pull the O2 tube and immediately reinsert. Stan

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paull
I've never tried fluid in the tires, but this string did give me an idea. How about drilling and tapping a hole into the rim (1/4 ") NEXT to the valve stem. Pump (or pour) the windshield washer fluid in the newly tapped hole and let the displaced air escape through the propped open air valve. When full, plug the tapped hole with a threaded plug. Sound feasible? It does seem easier than breaking the bead every time and you can probably get more juice into the tire this way. Just an idea.. Paul L.

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dlcentral
I agree with Tim and Paul weights seem to perform better than liquid filled weights.Just my opinion also.I have had both types and the iron or concrete weights are a lot less hassle.I recently made a very nice set out of 2 bags of Sakrete and some old 1/2" pipe..Cost under $10![2---80 lb. bags.] dlc

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dlcentral
OR drill a BIG hole in the rim and fill the WHOLE tire with sakrete!You could tote the Empire State Building with your trac when done with that!.AND NO more flats/just change tires/rims when tread is shot!I wonder what 10.50's filled would weigh...EACH!? dlc

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