Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
Chris727

Is it worth restoring a 707 broadmoor?

Recommended Posts

Chris727
I have an old broadmoor, I don't know if it was a 6HP manual start or a 707 with electric start originally. The motor is gone but I have one I believe to be a 6, 7, or 8. It has a two speed transmission. I did some figuring and it would cost me $130 plus decals to do a full and proper restoration. I have lots of parts from others I've parted out. Could I sell it with maual start for over $300? I know many broadmoors can't bring $50 on ebay but I'd like to use up some spare parts. I'd have to make at least double the money for it to be worth doing. Thanks. Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ehertzfeld
Why not just keep her? In my mind "if it's yellow or orange" it's worth restoring. But that is just me. If you are trying to make money on it and the #'s dont add up then I guess it's not. But I would just do it and add her to the collection. LOL ELON

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mowerman1193
"Is it worth it?"..To make money on NO I doubt it..If you are trying to clean up parts and make some $$ you would be better off either selling parts or putting all the parts together to complete the tractor and sell it that way and let someone else do the project.. These tractors dont seem to be very desirable to most people so trying to make money on them usually won't happen..Thats a plus for me and thats why I like them cause most times you can get parts cheap or even whole tractors (don't find that as often with the GT's)..Being a stay-at-home-dad and the wife making money I have to take the cheapies and freebees,expecailly when the wife is in charge of the money,LOL I have never done a full restoration and made money whether it was a good collector type tractor or whatever...its just never happend to me...But the real question is what do you consider a full restoration??To me its rebuilding everything(motor, trans, replace seals ect. ect.)..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rjgoth
I would restore it. The way I look at it these tractors are getting older every year, and each year parts will become more and more difficult to obtain at a reasonable price. Yes there are plenty of parts availiable now, but how many parts will be available in 10 to 15 years at which time many of these tractors will be 50+ years old. In my opinion restore what you have right now, do a professional restoration job, that way this tractor will easily last you another 40 years. Think of it this way; if you part out every tractor you get your hands on, never restoring any of them. Then 10 - 15 years down the road you decide to restore one only to find out that the parts are next to impossible to come across, and the price for them is sky high. You can have a mint looking tractor and still "use it" you just need to take care of it and not abuse it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Agricola
According to your profile you have lots of projects and this might be "one" too many. I know one can seldom make money on a whole tractor. Sort of like buying a new car and figuring you can sell it and make money. No way! Get them running and enjoy them. Right now I have running, an old Landlord, a 725, a Broadmoor, a JD 140H3, Snapper LT16. I will be getting another Broadmoor going over the holidays and then I get playing with a few custom ideas. If you want to make good money, get a job. That way you might get benefits. Old tractors are "fun" things. That is why I am making two stops this weekend. One to pick up an ebay purchase another to swap some parts for a tractor. No money, just fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PatRarick
It boils down to, "What is your idea of restoration?" Mine is about the same as mowerman's. That is, completely rebuilding every mechanical and electrical part on the tractor, stripping everything down to the bare metal, remove all dents and dings, repair any tears in the metalwork, re-upholster or replace the seat with an original, and install new tires. When it is finished, the machine is no different than one that has come right off the assembly line. Under these guidelines, a restoration is definately NOT a money making proposition. On the other end of the scale, others consider a restoration to be a rattle can paint job. You can make money there. The majority fall anywhere in between these two extremes. Myself, what I consider a restoration, and what I do to a machine are two different things. I want my machines to look nice, but I only attempt those projects in my spare time where I don't place a lot of value on my time. I maintain or repair, not rebuild my equipment, because I use it. I am happy if it looks good and works good. Last summer, I was given the opportunity to purchase two Simplicity 75th anniversary models for $4500 each. One has been on the showroom since new and the deck is still in the crate. The other has not been uncrated yet. Tempting and definately worth the price, but I would never use them. They would be showpieces and nothing else. I can't afford a $4500 showpiece. Likewise, if I restored a tractor according to my opinion of a restoration, it would also be a showpiece. I'd never use it. If I'm ever in the financial position to own such a showpiece, I would restore every one of my tractors. Bottom line is, what are your intentions for the machine and what is it worth to you? That should be what your decision is based on. Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727
I figured I would just use cans of Chevy Orange engine paint, all the body panels would be straightened, sanded, primed and painted. I have 32" deck for this tractor that I was trying to sell but no one seemed to want it. It would also get a new seat, just one of those pan style from the farm and home stores. The motor would get new rings because its a smoker. This wouldn't be for about a year before I can really get around to fixing it up. Maybe I'll just put it together the way it is and sell it with a cheap rebuild on the motor. I can't keep it for myself becuase I'm trying to save garage space just in case an old Landlord or B series with hydrolift comes along. I just feel sorry for the old broadmoor. I really liked how the early ones looked. Thanks for the replies. Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mowerman1193
quote:
Originally posted by rjgoth
Think of it this way; if you part out every tractor you get your hands on, never restoring any of them. Then 10 - 15 years down the road you decide to restore one only to find out that the parts are next to impossible to come across, and the price for them is sky high.
I hate to see these tractors get parted out as well, but you have to keep one thing in mind...If nobody parted out tractors then the parts would not be avalible now....and one parts tractor might save the lives of ten tractors that are getting attention...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kent
IMO, you're not really going to make money by restoring a tractor. Maybe, and just maybe, you'd recoup your money invested from a quick paint job -- if you could re-use existing decals.... but still not enough to cover the time spent. IMO, the most marketable tractors are those that are complete (down to the small items like grilles, metal emblems, chrome trim, etc.) and are in good running condition so that they could be put to work immediately. Most people want to either (a) put them to work, or (b) restore them themselves. When I mean good running condition, I mean one that you could start up and mow your lawn with tomorrow (assuming the grass was still green and growing). Also, "bare tractors" without any attachment, especially the mower deck, don't sell as well as a tractor with at least one attachment of some kind -- again, most people want to put them to work. But, several attachments don't really help the value as much as the attachments, if sold individually, would bring. IMO, the most "marketable" package in most parts of the country is a good running tractor with a mower deck. A plus is either a snowthrower or dozer blade. Beyond that, you'd likely make more money by splitting up the package and selling any additional attachments one at a time. Just my thoughts from watching quite a few of these things being sold and traded....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TimJr
Pat has it right. The word "restored" gets thrown around pretty loosely. Redone or fixed up is a good way to describe what some call restored. Restored to me also means "correct", or as original. The wrong seat, wrong paint etc. don't count as restored. Doesn't mean it's not nice, just not restored. No doubt that restoration takes time, money and research into what you are working on. Not much of a market for restored tractors. Most of us would rather try doing the work ourselves for the pride and lack of immediate funds. Just my opinion. Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727
Most people in my area tend to paint things very poorly, I call it a "Spray Paint Special." This is common to cars, trucks, tractors, even mobile homes. I've seen some pretty pathetic paint jobs. Most repaints I've seen were not sanded or primed. If I paint the tractor I would wetsand and polish the paint to shine. No overspray on tires! No painting over chunks of grease. The poor methods of painting really bother me. A spray can can do very good as long as the preparation is right and you don't have runs. I have use of a sandblaster so sanding isn't a big problem. At this point I don't know what the fate of the broadmoor will be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bunky
Well I agree that your not going to make Money doing a complete restoration and selling it, I also hate to see these tractors parted, but you have to have parts to make tractors... I would just restore it and keep it, I like them because as mowerman say they are a little Cheaper to purchase and there seems to be a few parts available....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Agricola
There ain't nothing like old steel. When I was a fork lift mechanic, the owner/boss would rebuild forklift after forklift and just promote it as old steel. I love jumping on my Landlord, throw in a bit of choke and fire that momma right up. And it is over 35 years old. I bet my tractors, both garden and farm, average over 40 years of age. Well over half fire right up without charging the battery. And they cut, pull, sound so much better than the new ones. Last summer, my Dad decided he wanted a new machine, he bought a Scotts, built by John Deere. That machine is 25hp and can't hold a candle to a Landlord that has less than 10hp. Get 'em, fix 'em, play with 'em, work 'em and share what don't need. (Sounds sort of like a wife) :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×