Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Boney

Muffler, what to do

Recommended Posts

BigSix
Boney: I haven't done the following w/ an exhaust, so if I'm wrong, hopefully someone will correct me, but this has worked on the kingpin of an F-100, for example (although there I used serious heat, not propane) and many other recalcitrant parts.... Have you tried the Spray, Wait, Twist, Heat, Spray, Twist, Curse (that's optional, but seems, truly, to help!) Method? Sprays I like are P.B. Blaster and Zep. Try gently heating the head around the muffler, with even a propane torch. Alum. or iron block? Either way, careful heating of the the female threads can expand them. If you're heating, and expecially if alum., be careful not to "shock cool" the metal with your spraying. Also be mindful that the propellant and contents are presumably both very flammable, and might ignite from hot componenents, even w/o exposure to open flame--my opinion, but better safe than sorry. IOW, don't spray right after you've got it really hot.... You might also try some gentle tapping, with a hardwood block struck by a hammer, against the end of the exhaust pipe, if you can get a straight shot on it, into the head/theads. Anything to begin to ease the deathgrip b/w the two parts/metals. In this same vein, you might try a cold chisel (extra careful if alum. head) done onto the threads, as close to the head as possible, to try to collapse the pipe slightly, to allow the penetrant in. Oh, yeah...sometimes this method takes days/weeks. Spray in morning, before work, call g.f. at lunch, have her spray, then work it over for 20 min. before dinner, then spray before going to bed. Just what's worked for me, in the past. Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rjgoth
I had this same problem. I used Kroil there is a link for it somewhere on this sight. It is a very good penetrating oil, and I soaked it for about a day, reapplying it every few hours. Then I got the largest pipe wrench that I could find and was able to get it off that way. I have found that Kroil and some heat from a torch works very well also. Good luck to you. Ryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ReedS
I like all of the above but one thing that might help a little is once you have a good bite with the pipe wrench, hit it with a good hammer as a little bit of shock will go a long way. Think of an impact gun. Another way to accomplish the impact effect is cut the muffler off leaving the pipe section with a square end and then hit the end of the pipe all of the way around in a circle. Of course if your trying the save the muffler the best option is to heat the block with a torch so that the threaded area expands slightly. If there is a jam nut loosen that first. Just my 2c worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Killer_A-C
I have tried to let the engine get hot and tried to get it out that way. I has never worked for me. Usally it will break off leaving the treaded piece still in the head. If this happens take a small cold chisel or screwdriver and beat the little piece that is left to the center. It is soft and it bends easy it will come right out. Be careful. A friend of mine got a B112 and tried removing the muffler while the engine was cold and broke a big chunk out of the threaded part of the head. Hope this helps,Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PatRarick
Two things that have worked for me. When there's enough pipe, I weld a plug to the end, then weld a 5/8" nut onto the center of the plug. Spray a good penetrating oil on the threads. Take a flat punch and pound on the pipe in several places right next to the block. Use an impact wrench and a 15/16" socket and hammer away. May have to repeat this a few times. Sometimes it helps to heat the block around the pipe while hammering with the impact wrench. The other way is to use a hacksaw and cut the pipe off about 1/8" to 1/4" from the block. With just the hacksaw blade, cut the pipe in two places, directly across from each other. Cut all the way through the pipe. You will cut a slot in the threads of the block, but that doesn't create any problems. Once the pipe is two seperate pieces, use a small cold chisel and bend the edges of each piece to release them from the block. Make sure that the engine is in a position that the exhaust valve is closed so that metal filings cannot be blown into the cylinder. Better add that if you choose to weld a plug and nut to the pipe, make sure that your ground clamp is on the pipe. Do not touch the electrode to ANYTHING but the pipe, plug, or nut. If you touch anything else, you take the chance of ruining the engine bearings. Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ka9bxg
If it broke off flush you can also use a hacksaw blade(blade only and saw into the pipe a bit and then use the cold chisel.I have spiecal punches that I use.Take your time and it works well.Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PatRarick
Joe, when you have done a lot of welding, so much of it just becomes "common sense" to you. I'm sure you know that. You forget that those not familiar with it don't understand what can happen. Sometimes I have to back up and add to an explanation. Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
I usually cut the pipe off about an inch from the block. Then with a die grinder and a 3/8 or 1/2 inch diameter stone, I grind a slot in the inside of the pipe in only one area till I break through and just barely touch the threads. This slot needs to be all the way from front to back. Then use a drift or chisel to hit the protruding pipe just to the side of the ground area and fold it inward. The pipe will break at the ground area and then the pipe can be folded toward the center and will usually release. I have used this technique a couple of times on tractors and many times on automobile exhaust pipes that were rusted off a good muffler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×