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Allis_B12

Don't ever use JB Weld for gas tanks- Pics

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Allis_B12
I did, when I saw that the package claimed it fixed gas tanks. I used it to "fix" the underside of my gas tank. It lasted for 3 months. I put half a tank of gas in my tractor when it ran out. Then I finished what I was doing, parked it overnight, and found that it leaked the entire tank on the paint. A lot of the paint on the bulkhead and inside the box frame is rising and bubbled. Just saying this because I don't want it to happen to others. I contacted my local dealer to see if new gas tanks are available. He said they were NLA. I thought I saw somebody on here say they were available. Are they?

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dirtsaver
Joel I think you may need to check with a dealer that carries NOS. Someone like Sandy Lake Implement or Pierce Sales may have them. As for the JB Weld, I have used it on gas tanks of farm tractors, trucks and cars for years. Preparation is the big key. When you think you have it clean enough, clean it that much more and it should be ready. Larry

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Al
HI, I have used fiberglass matt or glass cloth and epoxy. Check that the epoxy is not damaged by gasoline. Sand the tank to bare meatal. Coarse sandpaper provides a tooth for better grip. Cut a piece of starched matt to cover the bottom of the tank and about 1/2 way up the sides. Put the matt or cloth on some Saran Wrap. Pour the epoxy on it and work it in using a craft stick [popsicle stick] until it is saturated. Pick the Saran wrap up and put the cloth on the tank. You can smooth it out through the Saran wrap and then lift the Saran wrap off or you can leave it on. This will permanantly fix the whole bottom and up the sides. These are the only areas that rust. My 2 cents worth and its free, value accordingly. Al Eden

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ka9bxg
I still think the best way is soider a piece of sheet steel in it.I have done this quite a few times.It does take a while to do it but you will not have to worry about it for a lot of years.or bring it to any radiator shop and they can do it might not be cheep but check it out. Just my 1 cent worth Bob

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dirtsaver
Bob I like that idea. One of my tanks has so many holes that might just be the only way to save it. Trouble is, the pinholes are in the rounded areas on the end too. That one may take several methods to fix. Larry

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andy gartner
All of the above good ideas, but also, have to ditto Paul here, if tank is set up right JB Weld has worked. Myself, I like two part epoxy's or resins/hardners/glass for decks, gas tanks, anything.

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JoeJ
:DI have had the best luck with grey marine tex. I got it form a boat place, I think it was a 2 part thing. But here again, preperation was the key to it working. But I noticed today it is starting to come loose. But guess it held for 8 or 9 years. ;)Being an old welder, I have a problem with a welder in a tube!:D Give me my 6010, a DC machine and back off!! Da sparks is goin to fly.

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JoeJ
Andy, if you really are andy, :DIt is a fact that some may disagree with, but they are just wanna bees. ;)I now travel in the company of office personel, you know "The Shiney Butts" we are rather an exculsive group.

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forresti
i had the tank on my old Gilson bottom start rust out pinholes and what not . clean the inside ,i epoxy the outer bottom and use that Kreem i use for moped , motorcycle tanks .works like a charm. Dan

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Allis_B12
I just got back from camping, that's why I haven't responded. This summer, I prepped the entire tractor, including the gas tank. I carefully wire-brushed the tank, and a few holes appeared under the paint. I finished sanding it, then put JB on the holes. I don't think my prep work was the problem. Either the gas created a new hole or the JB let go. I don't want it to be show perfect, but I'd like something I'd be proud to display. We bought a couple of the epoxy repair kits from NAPA, but I'd still prefer a new tank. I'd rather trust a solid new tank than my own handiwork. I'll try the fiberglass and epoxy when it warms up. Joel

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Allis_B12
Okay, I ran outside to take pictures of the damage:

The gas ran out the other side of the frame.

Most of this is bubbled up.

And the underside of the tank. So, can I fix the paint damage? That's what really angers me about this whole mess. I also forgot to show you the new tires:

They're Carlisles all around. I picked turf tires for the front so that I won't damage the lawn when turning. It's too cold right now (see the snow in the background) to paint the rims. Now that the tires are done, the tank lets go. Always something to do.:) Joel

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UCD
Fiberglass is not a good repair for a gas tank unless the whole tank is covered. On a tank with just a patch with fiberglass the gas will work it's way between the metal and fiberglass and pop it off. In all of my years of repairing gas tanks in my garage The best way to repair a tank is to solder or braze it. That was not always possible. The easiest and fastest way was to use an epoxy gas tank repair kit i.e. those from NAPA. These kits can be used to repair a tank on the vehicle with the gas still leaking from the hole. The kits come with a bar of Bee's wax to stop the leak, some coarse sand paper to clean the area around the leak and some fiberglass cloth to reinforce larger holes. A leak that you can access with out removing the tank can be repaired in less than 20 min.

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JoeJ
Joel, Just curious, what did you use for primer under the yellow? I can understand you being up set, that was a fine looking tractor!! I'm not a painter, but would think that re-preping it and touch up would bring back to looking good.

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Allis_B12
I used Martin Senour grey rattlecan primer from NAPA. The paint was Martin Senour automotive, also from NAPA. The metal is bare because I used an angle grinder to remove all the old paint. The paint stuck well before the gas lifted it. Maynard, the gas repair kit I got came with epoxy and small fiberglass strips.

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fireballv8
Braze a sheet metal patch over it, then go to the motorcycle shop and get a product called "kreem" that has an acid etch (to clean the tank) and a polymer to coat the tank inside. It will not leak again, it will not rust. Follow the directions though.

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KSever
Whew!! Was out changing the fuel filter on the new 63 Chevy truck tonight. Found that the previous owner had used something that looks like JB weld on the inlet line threads to the carb instead of buying a new neoprene washer. Just by chance I happen to check for leaks after installing the new fuel filter and found they're so called thread sealer to be hard and cracking. It was spraying gasoline all over the intake manifold. Went down and picked up a new neoprene washer from Chevy which was suppose to be in there in the first place for free. That sure makes me feel better since I won't have to be looking at a new flame paint job on the hood. Moral to the story is replace what is suppose to be there right the first time and keep enjoying your toys how they are suppose to be enjoyed.

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