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rslade

K301 Rebuild -- Updated ...

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rslade
Hi All, I completed a rebuild on a Kohler K301 from my 7112 last month, tested out OK ran great. I brought it out to plow some snow yesterday, worke ok for about a half-hour and Bam, blew the (new)rod. I tore it apart today and inspected the damage. It apears that the journal was not getting any oil (The bearing surface seems to be melted to the journal). The crankcase was full, the rest of the engine seems well lubricated, particularly the cylinder wall, which depends on the dipper used to lube the rod journal. Anyone have any Ideas?? :( Whoo Hoo - all done. I found a used crank on ebay, it was marginal but Acceptable (crankpin was at the bottom of the wear tolerance). Reassembled it over the weekend, benchtested it on sunday, Pulled the oilpan and the rod cap and checked for good lubrication. Everything is working fine. I got to plow snow tonight, 8" * 2600 sq ft. Life is Good8D8D8D

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papamerkle
Sounds like the rod was off 180 degrees. Rod gets lubrication from a oil hole in the cap. If it's off 180 degrees it will very little to no lube. Two other possibilities are too many RPMs or rod/piston clearances too tight. Hopefuly it wouldn't cost too much to repair. K301 are good motors.

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rslade
I hope that iwas it ... the Kohler manual refers to the orientation o fthe "C" and "D" style pistons but not the "A" style (which I have). It does show the location of the oil hole relative to the rest of the block, which I do not recall seeing before. I'll just get another one and try again .... If there was an easy way to get the aluminum deposits off of the crankshaft ....

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papamerkle
If this was mine I would take crank to my machine shop. He may be able to polish rod journal. If not rod journal will have to be turn .010 under stock size. Hopefuly that will take care of it. If not you may need a new crank.

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Al
Hi, I know of people that have used muriatic acid to remove the aluminum and then used extra fine crocus cloth to polish the journal. I have no experience with this, and would caution to be very careful with the acid, both for burns and breathing the fumes. Al Eden

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DaleC
I have read the same thing as Al just mentioned. I have never used the acid, but have polished with the very fine crocus cloth. Just do it enough to get it bright, i.e. smooth. It is probably blue from the heat which should not hurt it if you get it clean with the cloth. The safest bet is the machine shop. Especially since you have to buy a new rod anyway. I used to run a auto parts house in a rural area and I sent a lot of kohlers out for short block work. You are less likely to have a problem.

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rslade
Thanks for all of the input. I'm taking the crant to the shop this afternoon, I have to order a new rod anyway, and the $25 it will cost to polish and check it is well worth it. the crank does not seem to have any damage other than the aluminum deposits, and the rest of the block is OK, save aluminum bits all over . Now I just have to get over that "Duhhh" feeling from not checking the orientation to begin with. Well, we all make mistakes I guess, and it did run great for most of the hour I got out of the original rebuild. :D

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Al
Hi, One way to remember on the rod is to look at the rod and turn the crank in the direction the engine turns. Look at the rod cap. As the dipper is coming down into the oil, the hole in the rod is on the leading side. [Ahead of the dipper] Also if the pistons are marked, it is because the wrdist pin is offset to reduce piston slap. Both orientations are important. Al Eden

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rslade
Hey Tony ... this is scary, I just now got back from Zeeland, visiting my brother (he moved there from Grandhaven). Thanks for the good wishes, I won a crank on ebay this morning and I will be paying more attention when I reassemble it than I did the first time ... Rick Slade

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