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Jason

A Question?

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Jason
Hi It's been a while since I posted, family christmas and new years have kept me busy, I got my other Agco Allis tractor home, the 512 and pulled it home slowly behind my 1920H even though it is not a good idea to pull hydrostactic tractor home, I had no choice but to pull it home, it would not start and the dealers forklift was broken down and had to be sent away for repairs. Yesturday I changed the hydrostatic filter on my 1920 and finally got thatcleaned out and put a fresh filter on. When I opened up the air filer on my 1920H there was oil on the foam screen(sorry don'tknow the real name)that surrounds the air filter. Any way do you guys or girls know what the problem is with the oil comeing up into the air filter? My guess is that it could be a back fire, but I didn't hear or have one lately. I will have to take my 1920 to the dealer next week to get it's electric clutch examined, nothing's wrong with it but I don't know how to inspect the electric clutch myself, and it should be examined and fixed if a problem is found before the grass season roles around again, because I don't want down time during the grass season. So I will probable ask about that oil problem. By the way this may be a dum question, I am just new with the 512 but I can't seem to find the battery or where it is suppost to be, it's not under the seat I don't think, so could someone with a 512 please help me out? Thanks Jason

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Kent
Jason, I don't know if the new tractors still require it, but on the oldies, the foam on the outside of the air filter was supposed to be lightly oiled, so it would attract and hold the dust that could penetrate and clog the actual fiber air filter inside. I've cleaned these prefilters two ways -- either blow them out with compressed air from the inside (after brushing off the caked on gunk), or very gently wash them in warm soapy water, then squeeze the water out and let them dry. The, lightly reoil them before reinstalling. I just use the "leftovers" in the bottom of the oil bottles from where I've done an oil change, though you can actually get oil specifically forumulated for air filters. (K&N high-performance automotive air filters use their special oil, for example, to maintain your lifetime warranty on the filter.)

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Al
Jason, The pre cleaners should be oiled. Not so much that they drip. Do not twist them it destroys the cells. Clean it and let it dry pour some oil on and squeeze it until saturated. Then squeeze the excess out, next take an old towel or sweatshirt etc. and squeeze the filter in it to blot out the excess. The cells should have an damp film on them. This oil captures the fines [like talcum powder size] until there is a layer of dust on them, then they go on through and get in the paper filter clogging it. The Precleaner should be cleaned and re oiled about every 10 to 15 hours of operation in the Summer when dirt is present. We usually put a new filter and pre cleaner on when we service a piece of equipment, and clean and oil the old pre cleaner and put it in a Zip lock bag and send it home with the customer. Then they can just swap the pre cleaner and wash the one on the tractor and when it is dry oil it and put it in the bag for the next swap. If the engine is blowing oil out the breather and it is a magnum, it may have a bad breather or may be getting very tired and have a lot of blow by. My 2 cent s worth and its free, value accordingly. Al Eden

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Jason
Thanks for the Help you guys I appreciate it, my 1920 does not have a magnaume engine but a Kohlar Command 20Hp,because my model is a 1996 so it has the newer type engine. I will look under the seat for the battery, It must be covered by the rear panel that is in front of the rear hitch. Take Care and thanks for the help Jason

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KenK
If the 1920 has a lot of hours on it and the breather is ok.It could very well be a head gasket,changed a few blown gaskets that where blowing oil in the air cleaner.Usually blows out between the cylinder and valve guides.Causing cylinder pressure in the crankcase making it blow oil anywhere possible.

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Al
Hi, The battery on your 1920 should be under the plastic plenum behind the engine that ducts the air from the hood to the transmission cooler and into the engine. It should be held on by a wing nut in the front or a couple of rubber bands, depending on the year. Al Eden

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Jason
Thanks but I know where the battery is on my 1920H, I just can't find the battery on my other tractor, my 512H Agco Allis which I just got a week ago. As for the hours I only have 543 hours on it, is that enough hours before I have to change the gaskets? Thanks Jason

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RedbarnRick
Jason the electric clutch adjustment is a real simple job. All you need is a .012 feeler gauge and a 1/2 or 9/16 wrench,with the deck off and while under the tractor look at the clutch carefully and you will see three slots in the side of the clutch above each adjustment bolt slip the feeler gauge in and tighten the bolt till you feel a slight drag on the feeler gauge do this to all three side and go around a second time until you have even drag on the feeler on all three sides. Your good to go for quite a while after that. If you haven't already done so download the manual for this tractor from simplicity tech pubs.

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Boney
Jason, tractors are new to me so i can not help you much there but i have been using foam filters for a while. here is some good info about them. { i cut and pastted this, i did not write it} Kent if you think this is worthy maybe it could be put at the technical tip forum?.... Air filters on off-road vehicles are kind of a weird thing. On the one hand, they’re relatively easy to keep maintained. And that’s a good thing, because other than filling the tank up with fuel, air filters are the component that needs the most frequent attention. Despite all of this, the most common cause of ATV engine damage is running the machine with a dirty or mis-aligned air filter. A slight mistake made while cleaning and replacing a filter can lead to catastrophic engine failure. Besides engine damage, a neglected air filter just plain makes your quad run lousy. So why do so many riders have problems with their air filter maintenance chores? Maybe they just don’t know a few of the tricks and tips to doing it easy and right— tips that we’ve figured out over the years. • Some filters are better than others. Aftermarket companies put lots of effort into making more efficient and longer-lasting filters than the factories provide. The best foam filters are dual-stage, with a more porous outer stage and a finer inner stage. Premium aftermarket air filters, for the money, are simply the best investment you can make for your ATV. • It’s the oil, rather than the filter, that actually catches the dirt. That’s why using the correct type of oil and in the right amount is so important. • Less oil doesn’t help your filter flow better. A properly oiled filter does not significantly reduce airflow. Without enough oil, dirt can pass through. • Don’t use motor oil! A good filter oil has two components not found in plain old motor oil. A water-like solvent aids in dispersing the oil evenly. (It evaporates after about 12 hours.) Another component, which you can call "stickiness," keeps the oil suspended in the filter, preventing it from draining to the bottom and dripping off. • Don’t use gasoline to clean your filter. Gas breaks down the glue which is used to bind the seams in a foam filter. Use the manufacturer’s specified cleaning system (like Twin Air’s cleaner and cleaning tub setup) to insure long filter life. • After washing, a filter needs time to dry and additional time for the distribution solvent to evaporate. Having more than one filter means you’ll always have one ready to install and will be less likely to neglect this important part of your quad’s maintenance routine. • There is no such thing as totally clean air. Even filters for personal watercraft build up dirt and require cleaning, so don’t underestimate what your ATV filter is going through. • Pre-filters are the best innovation in the filter business since the two-stage foam units came along. Three companies make them: there’s Outerwears Pre-Filters, K&N Prechargers, and PC Racing’s Filterskins. They slip over the air filter and catch the largest contaminants before they even get to the real filter. There are specific pre-filters built for water-resistance or extra-fine dust. • Many racers and dune riders use K&N filters, which differ from foam units. These filters consist of layers of fiber, sandwiched between two wire screens and pleated for more surface area. Oil is also applied to this type of filter. These types of filters aren’t recommended for real dusty or wet conditions, which are better handled by the foam units. • If you ride for long periods in real dusty conditions, you should clean your air filter after every ride. Dune riders tend to pick up lots of sand, so they, too, need to stay on top of air filter maintenance, especially if they aren’t running a pre-filter. If you ride alone in a non-dusty environment you can get in quite a few days of riding before your filter needs cleaning. • Don’t rely solely on a visual inspection of the filter in your machine to know if its clean. It may have taken on dust that you can’t see that is working its way through the pores. Take it out and take a look at it, and if there’s some crud you might as well go ahead and clean it. It’s cheap motor insurance. FOUR-STEP FILTER CLEANING STEP 1: First off, a pair of cheap disposable plastic gloves will make this entire process more pleasant. Start by removing your air filter from the quad, being careful not to knock any dirt into the intake boot. There are several ways to clean foam filters. The best is to use a spray can of good quality foam filter cleaner. Spray it on and let it sit for a few minutes to loosen up all the dirt and oil. Then rinse the filter out under warm water, making sure the water flows only from the inside out. Running water on the outside of the filter will force the dirt farther into the filter, rather than out. To do a really thorough job, you can take the next step of dipping the filter into another cleaner such as Twin Air Liquid Dirt Remover, but washing with the first cleaner usually is enough. Hold the filter up to the light periodically and check for dirt. If you still see contamination, give it another rinse. If foam filter cleaners aren’t available, washing the filter with soap and warm water works, but may take more elbow grease. STEP 2: The next step is one many riders forget about. You have to let the filter air dry before you apply the oil. Don’t use a heat source such as hair dryer; this can damage the filter. A damaged air filter will pass dirt, and that’s the last thing you want for your motor. Once it’s dry, inspect it for any tears and to see if the seams are starting to separate. Air will flow through the path of least resistance, and a tear will be it. STEP 3: Always use a quality foam filter oil; regular motor oil doesn’t work. The easiest way to oil a foam filter is to pour some oil into a zip lock bag and add the filter. Work the oil thoroughly into the filter, making sure you get it into every nook and cranny. There are also spray-on oils for filters. You still have to work the filter rigorously to make sure the oil has penetrated throughout the filter. STEP 4: After oiling, let the filter sit overnight before installing. This will allow the excess oil to drain, and you can inspect it to make sure there are no dry spots. If you didn’t let the filter dry completely after cleaning, there may have been some water left, and oil doesn’t mix with water. This will result in unoiled spots on the filter when the water evaporates—not a good thing! When reinstalling, be sure not to let any dirt get on the inside of your filter after you cleaned it. If any gets in there, don’t try brushing it off; re-clean the filter. If the filter foam seats against the airbox itself, spread a layer of high-temperature grease on the portion of the filter that mates with the airbox and you are set. A clean air filter is the best thing you can do to keep your motor alive for a long time.

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