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ambler

Ags and Wheel weights combined

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ambler
I thought you might want to look at an old order Mennonite Simplicity. There religious practice prevents them from having rubber tires. I guess their not supposed to enjoy riding the things.

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ambler
They fabricate them out of steel. Its their religion. He owns a simplicity dealership and can't have computers etc. He has a couple beautiful carriages and all the old simplicity stuff you can imagine.

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KenK
That looks like a good way to make a milkshake.Fill glass with milk a little chocolate,mount on side of tractor,and push some snow.Oh and for those of you with false teeth,better put a little extra glue on.:D

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Bunky
Yes That would be neat to check out Daddycat... and I would have to agree with the Milkshake I'm sure they don't ride to smooth and think about the Grass it would tear up.....

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BigSix
Okay, that's pretty scary. Please tell me those aren't cupholders on the rear fenders? Hmmm...can't abide by rubber tires, but got room for a cold beverage? Nah! They must be handholds or somethin'. And it's hard to see, but the front tire appears to be rubber. Is that not the case?

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JoeJ
:DI can't be the only one that remembers steel wheels:D I remember getting to drive, I believe a Fordson, up a dirt road to the next farm. They laughed and said if we got caught, no one would write a ticket to a 6 or 7 yr old. The rear wheels had these un-godly big lugs on them, and oh yes, it was a rough ride even on a dirt road.

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BigSix
Oh, I've seen steel wheels. Never drove a tractor like that myself. I do remember a Fordson that had a flathead V-8 dropped in it, but I can't remember if the steel wheels on that had been switched to rubber or not, yet. Never drove that one either.:( I just find it, in my total ignorance of their religious practices and beliefs, slightly (no offense to the Mennonites, the Amish, or any other creed or it's followers) flagellistic, and unnecessarily archaic, I suppose. On the other hand, there's a certain charm in nostaligia. But aren't certain religions relaxing standards re: diet on Fridays and birth control, as just two expamples, to reflect popular mores? Not that I can say that's truly good or bad. These wheels just strikes me as...very devout, I guess. I'd better stop now....

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Ronald Hribar
Are you sure it was a Fordson? I know anything is possible , but the common conversion was the flathead ford v8 in the 8N series. And they had steel wheels qvilable for those tractors as well. The conversion that I am trying to find is the Ford 223 OHV straight 6 in the Ford 600 series. The one I saw was actually in the 1953 Ford NAA Jubilee tractor.

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rokon2813
What surprises me is if they are devout enough to go with the steel wheels what are they doing with a riding mower in the first place? I understand that he is a dealer but I would guess with steel wheels that is for his own personal use. There are Amish in this area and from what I understand from those who are friends of mine, If it pertains to their job or occupation modern conveniences are okay as long as they dont carry over into their personal lives. Of course every order of Amish, mennonite etc has slightly different rules. The family I knew best here had no electricity, phone, or running water in the house. One of his businesses, a saddle and harness shop, Had lights, phone, running water and a bathroom in the shop right next to the house. His son ran a small engine shop out of one of the other barns. He too had electricity and a telephone. Betwen the 2 of them they kept a loader around for loading and unloading goods. Out in the field they worked a 10 horse team, no tractors. If they went anywhere local it was by horse and buggy or rented taxi.

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johnmonkey
Dan, that seems close to the way the Amish do things in Southern Maryland. The mower shop that is rebuilding my BS 10 hp does not have electricity though. They run everything that they need through a compressor or generator. They have the steel wheels on some equipment and they don't have running water = outhouse. John H

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Ronald Hribar
The Fordson was an early tractor around the time of the 10/20 International. And yes there was a Ford /Fergunson. Ford had a good tracto and Fergunsen had the best and I think the best ever hydraulic system

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ambler
Actually these people are are old order Mennonites. Different bur related to the Amish. Who are the Amish? Are they the same as the Pennsylvania Dutch? The Amish are a religious group who live in settlements in 22 states and Ontario, Canada. The oldest group of Old Order Amish, about 16-18,000 people live in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The Amish stress humility, family and community, and separation from the world. Although Lancaster Amish are Pennsylvania Dutch, all Pennsylvania Dutch are not Amish. The Pennsylvania Dutch are natives of Central Pennsylvania, particularly Lancaster and its surrounding counties. Unlike the Amish, they are not all one religion. Instead, their common bond is a mainly German background (Pennsylvania Dutch is actually Pennsylvania Deutsch, or German). They also have Welsh, English, Scottish, Swiss, and French ancestry. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What is the history of the Amish? The Amish have their roots in the Mennonite community. Both were part of the early Anabaptist movement in Europe, which took place at the time of the Reformation. The Anabaptists believed that only adults who had confessed their faith should be baptized, and that they should remain separate from the larger society. Many early Anabaptists were put to death as heretics by both Catholics and Protestants, and many others fled to the mountains of Switzerland and southern Germany. Here began the Amish tradition of farming and holding their worship services in homes rather than churches. In 1536, a young Catholic priest from Holland named Menno Simons joined the Anabaptist movement. His writings and leadership united many of the Anabaptist groups, who were nicknamed "Mennonites." In 1693, a Swiss bishop named Jacob Amman broke from the Mennonite church. His followers were called the "Amish." Although the two groups have split several times, the Amish and Mennonite churches still share the same beliefs concerning baptism, non-resistance, and basic Bible doctrines. They differ in matters of dress, technology, language, form of worship, and interpretation of the Bible. The Amish and Mennonites both settled in Pennsylvania as part of William Penn's "holy experiment" of religious tolerance. The first sizable group of Amish arrived in Lancaster County in the 1720's or 1730's. New design steel wheels looks like they are working on the comfort factor. I believe these are handmade and cost more than $300 a set.

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BigSix
You know, Rokon said it best--this is all I was tryin' to say, and I didn't even realize it:
quote:
What surprises me is if they are devout enough to go with the steel wheels what are they doing with a riding mower in the first place?
RonH: You could very well be right. I was a kid then--I remember the flathead, which impressed me, and I remember someone saying the tractor was a "Fordson" but who knows if they were even correct? I wouldn't have. All I remember is it was a V-8 in an old tractor-lol!

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