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Boney

antifreeze VS winshield washer fluid

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Boney
I was talking to someone in the know the other day and mentioned putting windshield washer fluid in the tires. he asked me why not antifreeze....i gave him that look of a deer looking into headlights. He said antifreeze is heavier the ww fluid. I checked it out and on average you gain about 1 lb per gal. Now I did not check every antifrezze out there so there may be a heavier one because he did say there was some new stuff out there that was very heavy. Does anyone have any experience with this? While antifreeze is more expensive then ww fluid why not use your old antifreeze after changing it? just kind of thinking out loud on this idea.

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thedaddycat
WW fluid can be had for under 90 cents per gallon, antifreeze(glycol) is maybe $2.75 a gallon. Now when I did the 23X10.50-12 tires the other week, it took 7 gallons each. That would be almost $40 instead on under $14 for just one tractor. Now if oiu only have one to worry about that's fine, but try it with five of them....... For the almost $200 I'll use WW fluid and go buy another tractor!!

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UCD
Any liquid needs air to corrode metal, if the tires are loaded correctly with the fluid level above the top of the wheel air can not get to it. That is why tires loaded with chloride will not rust if loaded right. The tires on my 7790 have been loaded with chloride for 30 years with out tubes. I did get a pin hole in one but it rusted from the outside in. The rust was caused from road salt in an area where the center hub was welded to the rim. The road salt came from running the tractor on the streets back and forth from my auto repair garage to my house and Apt. building. Antifreeze reacts with some types of rubbers. Look at what it dose to radiator & heater hoses, it softens and rots them.

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Al
Hi, I used to use anti-freeze all the time. What I discovered is that when put in tubless,it seems to softem the rubber between the cords after about 3 years. We would see all sorts of contortions and gourds on tires. Would be all right if tubes were used. Have been using windshield washer fluid since about 1986 with none of these problems. My two cents worth and its free, value accoringly, Al Eden

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mowerman1193
quote:
Originally posted by Al
Hi, I used to use anti-freeze all the time. What I discovered is that when put in tubless,it seems to softem the rubber between the cords after about 3 years. We would see all sorts of contortions and gourds on tires. Would be all right if tubes were used. Have been using windshield washer fluid since about 1986 with none of these problems. My two cents worth and its free, value accoringly, Al Eden
I agree,My father put a mixture 50/50 water and anti freeze in the Wheel Horse and within 2-3 years he had to get new tires...This may not be the case with all tires though..as there was a discussion on another forum awhile back and 2-3 posted that they had anti freeze loaded tires for 20-30 years..BTW on the Wheel Horse my father did one tire went bad alot faster than the other so he just bought one new one and used a tube..and when the other tire gave out he decided to give up on the loaded tires and took the other tire off as well and the anti freeze had rotted a hole in the tube and it was starting to rot the tire as well...

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JoeJ
Maynard, In Kirks thread, he filled his tires, then stood them up and drained to the valve core level, I think. Isn't this giving an air space? And wasn't it mentioned that an air space was needed for some reason, mabey ride?

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roma3112
guys if sombody can post the correct way to tell if there is enough fluid in tires that would be great. I myself filled both of my tractors with fluid last year but would like to be sure i did it right to prevent rot/rust. thanks john

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mowerman1193
quote:
Originally posted by roma3112
guys if sombody can post the correct way to tell if there is enough fluid in tires that would be great. I myself filled both of my tractors with fluid last year but would like to be sure i did it right to prevent rot/rust. thanks john
I think if you position the valve stem at the 11 or 1 oclock position and you fill them up and then drain them off at the position above you would be fine...

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UCD
In order to prevent rot/rust in a tubeless mounted tire the fluid level has to be above the highest metal part of the rim. Once you have the fluid in you can adjust the air pressure with the valve at 12 o'clock position. if you are filling the tires though the valve stems on the tractor they should be at the 12 o'clock position. Laying on their side it doesn't matter. I don't run any air pressure in mine but you can add air with the valve stem at the 12 o'clock position. With out having a pump to fill the tires the best method would be by laying them on their side. A tire shop would use a pump to load them. If you are using tubes it doesn't matter on the fluid level.

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tractormike
I have a couple of tractors with windshield washer fluid in them, and have not had any problems so far. Antifreeze is very poisonous and has a sweet taste that will attract animals and kids to it so I decided not to use it. Also if you catch the washer fluid on sale I have found it for 75 cents a gallon.

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mongson
I don't have to worry about putting extra weight on my tractor. I have come up with the finest solution known to man. Since the beginning of Fall, I packed on 30+ pounds. So If you divide me in 1/2 evenly over each wheel that's approx 130 lbs of weight. Sure I have Dunlop disease but I don't have to worry about putting anything in my tires.

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