Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

An Easy Way to Set Timing on Old Briggs?


MarcS

Recommended Posts

Does anyone know of a quick and easy way to set the timing on old Briggs cast iron engines? Can't do it in the tractor because I can't get at the mag then. Have the engine out and on the bench. Any advice? Thanks in advance, Todder
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Todder, If you have a B & S Service Manual for the engine they give a procedure for setting the timing. Basically you do it on the bench with an ohm meter, or light bulb & battery, to set the points to break open at the right time (assuming the pickup coil is properly located and aligned with the marks). On my Model 19 the points are set at 0.020" with the points set to just open in the normal direction of rotation the Magna-Matic rotor is aligned to match the timing mark for a 23-A or 19. For a 19D with external armature set the points to 0.020". Then loosely install the flywheel with key and turn the flywheel until the points just start to open. At this point align the arrow on the armature with the arrow on the flywhee, remove the flywheel & tighten the armature bolts. The air gap between the armature and flywheel should be 0.010 to 0.014". Hope this helps. Roy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What model are you dealing with? Oh - wait - you're the guy that said he has a 7013 Hydro that I said didn't exist! Sorry - I guess I'll have to eat my words! :) I just searched your model 1690184 and found that it is indeed a 13HP Hydro-Vickers Limited Production! I guess that would make it a 7013H-LP. I think you may have a rare one there Todd!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, maybe a little further explainzation is needed. During the rebuild process the rebuilder installed a Magatron ignition. Sent in the flywheel to have repolarized and now runs fair. Have dialed in the carb as best I can, but it still seems a little retarted. So I no longer have points to set. Jeff, your right on! I knew I wasn't dreaming and thanks for the e-mail. Todder
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you got rid of the points then you are screwed. You need them to correctly set the timing. Just put the old points back on (but you don't need the coil). Set it as the first reply said then remove the points and switch over to Magnetron. I have a 23D that doesn't have a flywheel key and it must be timed this way. To time a 19 or regular 23 just move the rotor untim the correct number lines up with the mark on the rotor. Of course, the crank must be in the correct position. But be careful because the points OPEN when fire, which seems backwards.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a comment on Yeomans last sentence (reply 4.). When points are closed, current flows in the coil primary winding,and the voltage is low (6 or 12vdc). When the points open the low voltage in the coil primary winding is removed and the collapsing field induces a voltage in the secondary winding which has MANY more turns (coils) than the primary, creating several thousand volts. Kinda oversimplified, but basically a low voltage high current source produces a high voltage low current output.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

IF this is a model 23D engine you may have to fiddle with it for a long time. Yes, you have to remove the engine and set it on the bench. Only the olderones are this way not the newer ones have a plate that you slide to adjust the timing.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...