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SMahler

UPDATE! 712S not charging

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SMahler
Thank you for all your help so far - As instructed I pulled out the connector on the regulator (from alternator) and I do have strong voltage coming from alternator (whew!). So it looks like my regulator is shot...please help me understand how this thing works - it looks like the only wire connected to the regulator is the black negative cable from the battery. Did I miss something? There is a good bone yard near me and I plan to go hunting on monday....my favorite pasttime. How common was this model of R/R? Anything else I should try before replacing? Thanks

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Agricola
The purpose of the regulator is to control the current and volatage produced by the generator/alternator. Remember the purpose of the battery is to start the tractor, not run the lights. The generators and alternators can produce a range of voltages. If the voltage is too high, over about 13.8 volts, lamps burn out, batteries overcharge and points have a shorter life. The regulator in a generator system does this by controlling the amount of ground the Field termial gets via time. The regulator also disconnects the generator from the system when the unit is not running. In an alternator the regulator varies the voltage/current going to the armature. This thus controls the voltage coming out of the alternator. Most alternators now produced have the regulator built into the alternator case and need only one wire out. Quite a nice setup. When I was a mechanic in the 70's I was repairing equipment for IH and threw out lots of alternators and external regulators and replaced the mess with a combined unit.

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Dutch
quote:
Originally posted by SMahler
Thank you for all your help so far - As instructed I pulled out the connector on the regulator (from alternator) and I do have strong voltage coming from alternator (whew!). So it looks like my regulator is shot...please help me understand how this thing works - it looks like the only wire connected to the regulator is the black negative cable from the battery. Did I miss something?
In your previous post you stated
quote:
Originally posted by SMahler
...to make matters more interesting the wiring has been monkeyed with at some point, and does not match the pictures in my manual.
Incorrect wiring may be the problem. The DC wire coming from the RR should go to the POSITIVE side of the battery NOT the negative side.

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HubbardRA
I have two Kohler engines with alternators. The alternators use permanent magnets, so they put out AC current whenever the engine is running. They can't be turned off like the coil energized units. I'm not sure how the voltage is controlled. They have a very small solid state voltage regulator, about 1.5 x 2.5 x .375 in size and encased in molded plastic. Only one wire comes out of the voltage regulator and goes to the positive side of the battery through the ignition switch, so that the battery is disconnected when the ignition is off. Hope this helps.

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