Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

  • Announcements

    • Kent

      Sign In or Password Problems?   10/09/2016

      If you can't Sign In, you need to reset your password.  Use the Forgot Your Password link at the bottom of the Sign In screen, and the site will send you an email to reset it. If you have an AOL email account, use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the screen -- AOL is intermittently blocking email from the site.
    • Kent

      Feedback Please!   10/28/2017

      See News and Announcements forum.
Sign in to follow this  
tractormike

Found another panzer ( PICS ADDED, IT'S FINISHED)

Recommended Posts

tractormike
I know this isn't a simplicity but I just got a digital camera and another tractor project so I'm going to try posting pictures. Wish me luck using the picture resizing program. I haven't found out exactly how old this panzer is but I'm quessing very early 1960's or late 1950's. This one has elecric start on it and I,m going to rebuild it and give it to my wife. She liked my other panzer so much I had to find her one of her own. If this picture thing works out I'll post pictures of my allis's later.

It took me several tries to get rid of the diskett icon that kept showing up but I used Kents solution and it seems everything works now. Thanks Kent for all the helps you have put in to help us amatures post pictures. I have narrowed it down to probably a 1963 model by the serial number. NEW PICTURES ADDED- TRACTOR IS FINISHED. Here are some pictures of my wife's panzer now that it is done. The first three pictures are of her panzer and the last picture shows both of our panzers. My wife's panzer is a 1963 and has electric start just like the old simplicities. My panzer is a 1965 or 1966 and has a recoil start. Both have 7 horse briggs engines. These will be making the rounds of the shows we go to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bunky
quote:
Originally posted by JoeJ
Mike, Those are pretty cool and tough looking machines. Speaking for myself, I enjoy seeing everyones projects, Simple Allis's or not. ;)But now you have to promise some after shots too!
I have to agree Joe.. I too like seeing all projects Simplicity,Allis or others..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marion_Kerr
NICE FIND MIKE. Nice tractor. I bid on a tricylcle steering Panza in an estate auction few months ago and went higher than I wanted to spend but, it had already been restored. TO BONEY: Panza tractors were made I believe in the late 50's and 60's and maybe very early 70's in Pennsylvania. You can read about them on the internet on a "search". Interesting little tractors. If I find one at the right price somewhere, I'll probably own one someday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CleanBee
Mike, That is a very nice looking tractor, it looks like it'll take minimal work to make show condition again. The deck even looks solid. It couldn't have found a better home and it is also great to hear your wife enjoys this hobby too. Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JoeJ
At the Blue Mountain Show this past fall, in Bangor PA. There were a lot of these, Also some vendors in the flea market selling a few tractors and many parts. I think there next show is sometime in the spring. It is an awsome show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tacey
In my view, photos of these tractors don't do it justice. In person, they appear very stout, truly like a shrunken farm tractor. The rear punkin is not shrunken, however. I believe it was also used in an automotive application. The arse-end of a Plymouth car, maybe? Heavy, indeed. Tacey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tractormike
Glad you like my odd ball tractors:). This panzer is a 7horse,the early ones were 5 horse. They all used a narrowed plymouth car rear end in them. One brake shoe and the drum was left on each side. A lever ran from the one shoe forward to where you can push down on it with your heel. This gave it individual turning brakes. The tranny is a three step belt pulley on a shaft that tightens with the lever on the right side of the tractor. To change forward speeds you have to move a belt by hand from one size pulley to the next. For reverse you push forward on that lever and the wide flat part of the pulley runs against a rubber drive wheel on the end of the crankshaft and turns the shaft the opposite direction. The rear of that shaft has a small sprocket on it that chain drives a large sprocket that is attached to the pinion shaft of the car rear end. The tractor weighs about 600 lbs. This one is probably a 1963 model. It is stock except for the engine which has been replaced with a late 60's model. The fenders are a factory option. These tractors were built out east and you just don't see them around here (Wisconsin). Here is a picture of my finished 1965 panzer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gregc
quote:
Originally posted by Marion_Kerr
TO BONEY: Panza tractors were made I believe in the late 50's and 60's and maybe very early 70's in Pennsylvania.
Were any of the Panzers made in Pennsylvania? Copar, Inc., Panzer Products, Inc. and Pennsylvania Lawn Products, Inc. produced lawn equipment in Laurel, Maryland, Waynesboro, Virginia and Martinsburg, West Virginia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tractormike
Leroy, The shiny round thing is the driven 3 step pulley with the wide flat band around it is the part that runs against the rubber drive wheel on the end of the crankshaft. That pulley setup is the whole transmission for the tractor! The pulley is pushed out to tighten a belt to drive the tractor forward and for reverse the pulley is pulled in till the flat part runs against the rubber drive wheel on the crank and that turns the pulley backwards and then you have reverse. You have forward and reverse just by moving the lever on the right side of the tractor, but to change your forward speed (gear) you have to stop the engine, get off the tractor and move a belt from one groove to another, get back on the tractor and start the engine. The rear end is a plymouth, narrowed up quite a bit. It uses the original brake drum and brake shoe. I'm not shure that any of these were actually built in PA. The literature I have shows the Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia address.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tractormike
Hi Guys...This is Tractormike's wifey!!!! Glad you are all enjoying MY new tractor!!!! I love it and think it is really cuuuute...."Got me a good man and he can fix it up reeeal pretty!!!!!" Hey all you guys you should all get the wifey a tractor of her own....I think it is fun!! All my :X to my main tractor guy...Love ya

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marion_Kerr
Tractormike is lucky to have a wife that takes a interest in the hobby. My wife never much cared for my tractor-trailers or tractors but, never objected about my interests. Glad Mrs. Tractormike likes the hobby!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
I really liked the one at rhinlander...was that yours tractormike, my boy and i looked it over real good. They sure are a stout unit with a unique look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tractormike
Yes that was my panzer at Rhienlander last year. I'm glad you liked it. The panzer has been a fun tractor to take along to shows just because you don't find them around here and they are so different from most other tractors. Last summer was the first summer we really went to many shows but we made it to 6 and met a lot of nice people to visit with. I hope to have the new panzer done along with a couple allis B series to take to Rhienlander this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mowerman1193
Those Panzers are some cool tractors...Looks like you have quite a collection going there... I agree with the others...I like to see all the projects... Thanks for sharing..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×