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Agricola

Weight vs Torque

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Agricola
Though the winter season is more than half over, the talk of weights continues. What I wonder is... Which is more important the amount of weight you have on the tractor or the location of the weight. I realize many people fill the tires with fluids of various sorts and that puts weight right over the axle. But if that same weight was moved further back, it would now be applying more torque to the setup and thus more force downward on the rear axle. That is if you consider the fulcrum to be at the front axle. At the same time, if you consider the fulcrum to be the rear axle, the weight moved behind the rear axle will reduce some of the net torque on the front axle so you might need to add more weight on that end. My thoughts therefore might be summarized as ... Add weight behind the rear axle, like the box mentioned in another post and then add fluid to only the front axle. What think all?

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thedaddycat
Filling the tires with fluid does not put the weight on the axles. The weight of the fluid rests on the inside of the tire against the ground. The fluid rolls as the tire travels but the force presses directly downward against the tread contacting the ground. Another point is that the weight of fluid in the tire is not keyed directly to the axle so when you accelerate or brake the force is not taken up by the keys or keyways. If you need more weight then a counterweight, collar weights, weight box or wheel weights can be added on top of that.

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D-17_Dave
Kirk, don't forget that little thing called inerta. Energy in motion. Even if the weight is on or in the whel, if it's moveing and you want to stop or change direction. You have to apply enough extra force to stop the weight from moveing. However, as you stated the weight is directly on the tire ,therefor the weight isn't pusing down through the bearings so the transaxle does'nt have to carry the extra load; but it still has to pass the energy through it to move all the extra load.

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mowerman1193
I have always heard that the fluid and wheel weights are the best way to go..and that the counter/suitcase weights are hard on the transmissions and axles ect.. I am running both on my Broadmoor but I think I would do better by running my wheel weights and fluid in the tires than using that rear weight... I am hoping to buy a bigger (20x10x8) ag tire for my Broadmoor and run the wheel weights and fill the tires for next year...

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Kent
IMO, I'd add weight in the following sequence for traction: 1. Loading the tires -- puts the weight on the ground, not the axles. Also, since the fluid can move inside the tire when stopping and starting, it doesn't put as much immediate strain on keyways, etc. The fluid has some "give" while dead weight would not... the inertia of the weight is still there, but it is more gradually dealt built up or disappated. 2. Wheel weights -- also puts the weight on the ground, not on the axles. 3. Counterweights -- since they serve two functions -- helping lift the attachment on the opposite end of the tractor and adding weight for traction. 4. "Dead weight" -- such as a weight box, suitcase weights, Broadmoor rear weight bars, etc. As far as where the fulcrum is -- it is the axle that's between the weight and the rest of the tractor. The fulcrum for a heavy, front snow-blower is the front axle. The fulcrum for a rear counterweight to help lift that heavy snowblower is the rear axle.... The farther the weight is from the fulcrum, the more downward force it will apply. But, practicality and maneuverability become issues if you hang weights too far, since they'll get in the way.

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