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York rake

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Chris727
Eric, I would guess it would depend on how heavy the hookup is. A six foot is probably category one three point, I would guess. So Its probably awfully heavy in the hitching framework, but I would think if you rigged it up to sleeve hitch and had hydrolift something could be rigged up so it would work.

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MPH
Had a 5 footer on my B-112, with manual lift, about killed my left wrist. Got real busy making a 3pt for the 4040 when I scored it. It was fun on the B-112, with the 10.5 ag lugs I could pull it full of tilled dirt without a problem, but it was max load IMO. I'll see if I can find a few pic.

here the hitch I made up

a rear shot

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comet66
Martin: Do you mind if I infringe upon your hitch design? I have been pondering the same puzzelment for a few weeks now, waiting for some warmer weather to try and put something together. I firmly believe in the KISS principle and that is it, and would allow the same hitch to be used for the backblade. Nice work, you and the rest of the guys on this sight are pretty ingenious. Thanks for sharing. John

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MPH
Go for it John, I claaimed no patents on it:D:D. Only measurement I recall off the top of my head is it sits flat at 16 inches off the ground, which is the ht of the rake fram sitting level. If you need different angle pics I think I know qhich snow pile its under.

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BigSix
Marty: You GENIUS! Is that dozer/blower mount on the front of your tractor, with the weights, to make lifting the York rake easier? That's pretty innovative. I know you said that big York rake was a wrist-killer, but I imagine with the length of the front hitch, you get quite a bit of leverage with just a couple of weights, so that the lifting is pretty easy. Is that the case, or is it still hard to lift, even with your extended front counterweight? Thanks, Peter

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MPH
It was still pretty hard lifting Peter. I still think my angle of lift was off, esp now that I got a factory sleeve hitch on the Landlord, with the lift rod attached only 2 9/16ths from the pivot point. Don't claim to know what I'm doing most the time, I just do it, change it if I catch a clue somewhere. The wts out front helped a whole lot.

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HubbardRA
Front hitches like that have been used in tractor pulling for years. Another trick is to make the hitch telescope. If you need more downward force, just pull a pin and slide the weight farther forward then replace the pin.

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MPH
Didn't realize that Rod. I like the telescoping idea. Just experienced the effect of that with the Landlord and my field cultivator. First day out playing with it I dropped one wt on my blade hitch, which was mounted already, and found it was almost as effective as the 49.5 lb counter wt I just made. Its all about leverage.

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BigSix
Rod, I wasn't aware of the telescoping counterwts. either--thanks. Of course, Marty's usage is somewhat different, in that he's actually powering the rear lift via leverage + gravity, using the extended front counterwt. to increase the effect. I'm stickin' with my original assessment, then--GENIUS! Btw, Marty, did you design and fab up that rear hitch for the York rake yourself? What is that, 1/4 or 3/8" stock? Looks very "factory," cut on an angle, as it is. What do you cut steel with? I've found those very thin cutting discs on a 4 1/2 grinder work as fast as a torch, on approx. 1/4-3/8 stock, and much neater. Because I have to haul the gas to the island via boat, I'd rather buy the discs (which may be cheaper than the gas anyway!) than haul the tanks. Just curious about that hitch and how cut it....

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MPH
Peter, I don't recall for sure how thick that iron was/is, think it 's 3/8's. Up until 2 days ago when I bought me that pretty red chop saw in the fnt wt pics I been using my fire touch with propane'cheaper', with a pretty outta practice operator, getting better at it. I use a lot of disc's in my peanut grinder. I know so much about metal cutting I just learned of the little 4 in cutting disc's last summer working in Delta, cutting some heaavy stainless steel flashing. Came up with the angle by setting the rake level and made it long enough to clear the 10.5 ags at 45 degrees. If your thinking of making one I could dig it out and post a pic with some measurements, pretty sur I know which snow is hiding it, under the eve of the back porch.

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BigSix
Marty: Thank you for satisfying my curiosity. Yeah, those little cutting discs are awesome! I only discovered them myself a couple of years ago. You're correct, they're only 4" in dia., 4" x .045" x 5/8", to be exact--just went and checked my Makita grinder box. No, I'm not contemplating a York rake, but my Dad is. We're in NYS, I'm downstate, but go up to near-Canada frequently, and he's midstate. So if anybody's got a York rake for sale in NYS.... But yeah, when he finds one, I'd be interested in your hitch dimensions. But the snow will be long gone in NYS by then--maybe it'll even by melted in Tok by then?!!! So thanks again for your offer to excavate your snow piles, but that's not necessary. Stay inside and feed the fire. How cold is it these days/nights up there, btw? 25 mi. north of NYC, it's like 31-36 F now.... Had I wintered over on the island, upstate, near Canada, this year, I could have traded temps in the negative 30-40 degree F range, but downstate, we barely dipped below zero here. In 2002-2003, I consistently saw 17-19F below, but the River (even frozen!) kept it warmer than on the mainland, where they hit -30F. Oh well, maybe next year.... Blessed be, my man (that's if you're at all familiar with the Wiccan religion--I have some friends in that--I wouldn't want the Bushies , 'er, Bush supporters (can't be name-callin', now, can we? Liberals aren't allowed that luxury here--har har!) to think I'd gone all religious all of a sudden. I'm not actually a Wiccan myself, just like how "blessed be" sounds. When I think of "The Keeper of the Arctic Fleet" I think (fondly) that he is blessed and that us (mainlanders? Statesiders? What do you call us?) are all very envious of your wild, exciting, challenging, and very demanding existence in the Great North. Be well, my man. Blessed be. Peter

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