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bkassulke

Diesel Engines

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10HorseMan
Fuel economy is very good on a diesel and most of the time has more torque than a gas engine, Lot higher compression,. Disadvantages is that the timing is hard to adjust with a diesel, a person with common sense can adjust the timing on a gas engine but this is not the case with a diesel. :D

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BLT
Horsepower is horsepower 5 for 5, 10 for 10. The Diesel engine is a compression igition engine and because of that needs to be built with heavier components. It's effiency is a lot closer to an electric motor when it comes to fuel consumption as it only needs that amount fuel to keep the engine running. Electronic fuel injection for automobiles has now closed that gap somewhat. They are not cheap to rebuild, a fuel pump alone could set back a minimum of $3-400 denpending on its severity. Been selling Diesel engine all my life and when it come to the under 20HP stuff I stick to gasoline. Cheaper to repair. Now if you are going to keep the machine for 6-7500 hours, then a Diesel might be condsidered. Keep in mind that most garden tractors probably accumulate less then 100 hours per year.

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LBS
Last year I talked to an engineer at Lombardini named Larry. He explained all the different horsepower ratings to me. Cars are usually rated with theoretical cylinder HP, the Lombardini would be about 30 HP this way. And then there is peak HP that varies a lot but most small engine companies use this, the Lombardini would be about 24 in this rating. The Lombardini is rated 18.5 continuous brake HP . There is one more and I can't remember what it is called, it's a British rating maybe. But the L is rated 15 HP with it. And all this says nothing of torque. I may be a little of on some of the names; I heard this a year ago! Maynard, you will have to straighten me out if I messed up! It’s your turn anyway.

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AC808
The other advantage of diesel motors is that the torque is at about the same level throughout the RPM range...that means youll have about the same amount of power at low as well as high revs.

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UCD
The Lombardini Air cooled diesel in the 7790 simplicity and Allis Chalmers 920D was a 10LD-400-2 790cc and was rated by Briggs and Stratton (supposedly owned a share of Lombardini at the time) from who Simplicity bought the engines from at 18½ Hp. The British or metric rating is kW. The 10LD-400-2 is no longer made. The following chart shows the 2 cyl. air cooled diesels they make now and their ratings.

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PeppyDan
So, which rating would be compariable to how the Kohlers & Briggs are rated? I have a Kubota engine with the same types of ratings and I don't know which one to use! Thanks for helping us diesel illiterates. PeppyDan

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UCD
14 kilowatt = 19.0347026 horsepower [metric] 14 kilowatt = 18.7743093 horsepower [international] 14 kilowatt = 18.7656744 horsepower [water] 14 kilowatt = 18.766756 horsepower [electric] 14.7 kilowatt = 19.9864378 horsepower [metric] 14.7 kilowatt = 19.7130248 horsepower [international] 14.7 kilowatt = 19.7039581 horsepower [water] 14.7 kilowatt = 19.7050938 horsepower [electric] 15.8 kilowatt = 21.4820216 horsepower [metric] 15.8 kilowatt = 21.1881491 horsepower [international] 15.8 kilowatt = 21.1784039 horsepower [water] 15.8 kilowatt = 21.1796247 horsepower [electric] 19 kilowatt = 25.8328107 horsepower [metric] 19 kilowatt = 25.4794198 horsepower [international] 19 kilowatt = 25.4677009 horsepower [water] 19 kilowatt = 25.4691689 horsepower [electric] 21 kilowatt = 28.552054 horsepower [metric] 21 kilowatt = 28.1614639 horsepower [international] 21 kilowatt = 28.1485115 horsepower [water] 21 kilowatt = 28.150134 horsepower [electric] 27.9 kilowatt = 37.9334431 horsepower [metric] 27.9 kilowatt = 37.4145164 horsepower [international] 27.9 kilowatt = 37.3973082 horsepower [water] 27.9 kilowatt = 37.3994638 horsepower [electric] 30.9 kilowatt = 42.012308 horsepower [metric] 30.9 kilowatt = 41.4375827 horsepower [international] 30.9 kilowatt = 41.4185241 horsepower [water] 30.9 kilowatt = 41.4209115 horsepower [electric] Convert just about anything to anything else. Over 5,000 units, and 50,000 conversions [url]http://www.onlineconversion.com/[/url] Power Conversion [url]http://www.onlineconversion.com/power.htm[/url]

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BLT
All Diesel engine manufacturers use three HP ratings, gross HP or a balls out run to it until it seizes up, intermintent HP, a design calculation that should give you resonable engine life based on RPM and load factor. The last is continuous HP that will give you a 24/7 service stopping only to check the oil and maintence such as new oil and filter, ect. The buzz word in our industry is called B-10, or life to overhaul, depending what I do with this paticular engine, how long will it last?? Al Eden for sure and maybe Dutch might understand this. Ask all of this on a garden tractor dealer and you will get a blank TV screen to look at. He don't generally know detail like a car salesman but knows what will cut grass in his mind. An example, UCD has a dedicated tractor, which should be old enough to vote next year maybe. Anyway I am thinking that tractor doesn't have more then 1500 hrs on the hour meter. Most people don't the time to ask questions and most dealers don't volunteer pertinent info. Kind of like buying a car, you drive it until something breaks and then get really mad because you have to pay the bill. Why?? You didn't read the book in the glove compartment.

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