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Roy

Rust Removal

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Roy
I am trying rust removal by electrolysis. The first picture shows the part in the tank.

The next two show the part before going into the tank.

This one shows the battery charger volts.

This picture shows the crud coming off the part.

Will post "after" pictures to show the results later. May take a day or two.

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IronPony
Looking forward to the "after" pics. How big is the charger your using? How about a pic of it also? I have s couple of smaller ones that I used to charge trolling batteries with. Wondering if a smaller one would work?? Dan

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Roy
Dan, It is a small 2/10/50(amp start) charger. I am using the 10 amp setting. Would use the 50 amp start setting but I am afraid it would burn the charger up. It is not designed for a constant 50 amp output. Picture of the charger is below.

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SimpleMan
You may be on to something. Are you using water, or some other solution/mix. Even if the result is that most of the rust is being removed...it would be a lot less work later. Good luck with your experiment.

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comet66
I have a friend that uses this process on Musket Barrels all of the time. You might find this interesting. http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/electrolytic_derusting.htm http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/rust_molasses.htm A little info on electrolytic derusting

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Roy
Results so far are not as good a expected. Pictures show the progress. First picture shows bath after 8 hours.

This shows the bath after 24 hours.

This shows the part after 24 hours.

I have the part back in the bath. Suspect I need more amps or a better bath electrode. I used a flattened out coffee can. Time will tell what happens next. Oh, it does loosen/remove paint in the process. Wish it did not. I'm using Arm & Hammer Supper Washing Soda as the electrolyte.

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IronPony
Since electricty takes the shortest path, I am wondering if you put the electrodes on either side of the bucket it might work better?? Looks like they are on the same side and rather close together. Dan

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BLT
quote:
Originally posted by IronPony
Since electricty takes the shortest path, I am wondering if you put the electrodes on either side of the bucket it might work better?? Looks like they are on the same side and rather close together. Dan
I was wondering the same thing. If you added more sacrifice rods around the bucket. According to the attached article 10 Amps should get you by. http://www.oldengine.org/members/billd/electrol.htm

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LBS
I tried that with lye once and it did not do a thing. But it looks like it is working well for you. Are you using a washing soda solution? I'll have to try it again when I get finished with my current project! --[url]http://simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=28406[/url]

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Roy
Project is temporarily on hold. The + strap to the electrode in the bottom of the tank rusted in half. Electricity does take the path of least resistance. With the negative lead hooked to the part the whole part has a negative charge. Don't know how to get the positive lead hooked to the electrode (coffee can) in the bottom of the tank without running it close to the part. Maybe with a longer rectangular tank to get some distance between the part and the lead. Other method would be using the rebar method with rebar all around the tank walls and bottom. Will attempt again later and update the project status as I go. Wish me luck.

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JoeJ
;)Roy, I found an interesting thread on another site about this that may be of interest to you. I was amazed at what is being done and some of the side affects of this process.
quote:
there was even large equipment being cleaned that way using dc welders as the power source rather than a sipmle battery charger!!! running 100 amp 100% duty cycle welder will make quick work of it but you have to be sure to use lots of sacrifical rods all the way around the perimiter as the process is a "Line of sight" type process it will not travel around to the bacck side very well untill the base cleaning part is really cleaned...
[url]http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/showflat.php/Cat/0/Board/buildit/Number/368590/page/1/view/collapsed/sb/5/o//fpart/1[/url] Hope it helps or at least is interesting reading.

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Roy
JoeJ, Thanks for the info. I think I am having trouble due to low amps and wrong/not enough electrode in the tank. Am rethinking the process now. Looks like I need to get a better anode in the tank bottom and more amps to do much good. Will update everyone when the time comes. Right now it is temporarily on "hold". Is a Miller "buzz box" 180 amp welder AC or DC? I have one I can use if it is DC. Thanks again,

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thedaddycat
The Duty Cycle refers to the amount of time in a ten-minute span that the welder can carry that current. I have a MillerMatic 210(MIG) welder that will go up to 210 amps but only at 30% duty cycle. It will handle 150 amps at a 100% duty cycle. Since it's a wire feed welder it isn't really quite the same as a stick machine, having the trigger on the gun that controls the wire feed, gas solenoid and the welding current....

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Salthart
Its only my 2 cents worth but you may want to hear it. First of all, you solution is fine. The soda in the water does nothing but let the water carry the current. Seeing the output on the charger, we know that part is ok. As far as bumping the current, I have never done this but I have done electro-plating with copper and the first think I learned was that going up with the current was a no no. I was working with small parts and found that 1 volt worked best.. Above that and i had trouble with pitting and blisters. It also caused heat. I think that from what I have been able to read your trouble stemmed from a poor connection. Maybe you could try folding a piece of expanded steel to fit the container ? I think I will give this a try. I keep a container much like you show here with a Muratic acid/water mix that would have removed the rust from that part in a couple of hours. But it has a strong oder and I worry about how to get rid of it if it ever gets past the point of working... Let us know how this works out ! Has to be better than a steel wire brush ! hehehe

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Roy
Gang, I'm pretty sure my Miller is AC only. Am looking a larger battery charger or DC power source. I'm be careful not to exceed the duty cycle on whatever I wind up using. Low amps and volts should work but takes longer. Salthart may be onto something. From what I have read, rebar or plain steel works best. I'm going to try that next. Maybe a flat 16 gauge plate. Thanks for the interest and assistance,

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thedaddycat
I have a large stainless stock pot, my concern is that it will be eaten away by the process. Otherwise it looks like a really good way to get the job done even if you're not there.....

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