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maxtorman1234

Building Homemade Cab

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maxtorman1234
Thinking of building a cab. I'd have to use what I have, which would most likely be wood for the frame. Probably 2X2s. Once I have the frame, I would cover the outside with sheet metal, cut grooves in the wooden beams for a windows, slide them in, and silicone it. I would insulate the inside, then put another layer of metal on the inside. The four corners would be reinforced with metal tube, and I would overlap the metal and screw it into the wood. Not sure If this will be any good, But I thought id see how you think it would work. All opinions appreciated, Thanks ,

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HubbardRA
I'd make the frame out of tubing, conduit, or pipe, then screw or pop rivet the sheetmetal to it. I'd cut holes in the metal for windows and bolt a lexan or plexiglass sheet in from the inside using strips to sandwich it or at least large washers. If you want to insulate it, then I would glue rigid foam panels to the metal from the inside. Not only will it insulated against the cold, but it will also get rid of a lot of the noise from vibration of the metal.

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ehertzfeld
I would say the same on the conduit. I have doors and roof comming at some point, from another member. Im going to make my own frame using it. I havent figured out what I want to use for the front and back yet, other than plexiglass. I think the 2x4 would be alittle too heavy. Mite make for a rickity roof! Just my thoughts Elon

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BLT
From this area I have seen a lot of cabs made of plywood, plexiglas windows, used carpeting to cover the openings and a lot of paint. My uncles had these and they were all products of the depression, make it cheap but functional and at one time scrap plywood was all over. They just wanted out of the wind.

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ikipp
I'd use (emt) electical mechanical tubing. (available at any home builders store.) (Commonly known as electrical conduit.) It's very easy to work with and inexpensive. You can hammer the ends flat to provide a flat surface for screwing into. It bends easily and has some rigidity and strength to it. If you go with your original wood frame; consider using kitchen or bathroom caulk that is mildew resistant. I don't know if silicon caulk is mildew resistant. Mildew resistant caulk will lead to a much cleaner look, later on in time. Keep us informed as to how your project works out.

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comet66
I have the factory hard top, soft side cab for my 1920H. With comfortable winter clothing, Carhart jacket, uninsulated bibs, good boots and gloves I have not found the need for insulation. The only time it really gets very cold is if it is really windy. Other than that as long as you are out of the breeze it isn't bad because you are already dressed for the cold. I never measured it but these are constructed of something like 1/4" steel tubeing. The last couple of years I have even left my top on for sunshade in the summer with lock washers and self locking nuts it stays pretty tight and quiet. When you get around to doing it I would be glad to send along some pictures if you would like.

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maxtorman1234
My design would be sturdy, but it would weight a ton. Have a bit of extra insulation, so I thought i'd just throw it in incase. If everything works out, It will look real clean and tidy. Think I could try it, but I'd have to get a blade or blower for it first. I'd be easier to make one for the 416, but I have no attachments for it. Too hard to make my design work on the 917. THink ill slowly work on it, and see how it turns out. Might try some different materials. Thanks for the thoughts!

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powermax_paul
I like AC808's idea, rather than conduit, maybe just use 1" or 1-1/2" PVC Pipe and fittings for the frame. Lots easier to work with and fittings are cheap and smooth. Seen a few Ice shanties made that way:D Thought about making a second cab for one of my 9020's using a PVC frame. The plexiglass would be the expensive part. Could get fancy and use a plastic mortar tub for the roof. Built in raingutters.8D Paul

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Leroy
I have thought about this for a long time. If you can imagine a (rop) Roll Over Protection supporting the bulk of the weight. Then attatching a simular tubing bent to a reduced shape mounted to the frame in front of the foot pegs then welding the spreaders on top and front and sides to provide a mounting surface for lucite. because Plexiglass and Lexan will discolor. Acrylic will not. Locating hinges to support the material may be the most difficult to make it look professional, however the seals can be the same material that is bought in a roll that is used on automobiles. Adhesive that is used to attach the dryer felt seal to the dryer drum is the material to use to attach the rubber door seal to the frame. I will make one for my 7117 but first i have to get over the hump of repowering.

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maxtorman1234
Yes, just saw it today. Couldnt check it unttil today for some reason. Thanks, that gives me a good idea for a frame. Want to make a hard sided cab, but not sure how I will attach sides, or windows, but I need the frme first. Thanks,,

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