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SmilinSam

Ever have to pull the pan to remove the oil ???

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rokon2813
Yup, a mechanic showed me that. :D Looks like they been running Quaker State in that engine for years......;)}:) It was about 10 years ago. My moms boyfriend had an engine problem. I had a friend who was an auto mechanic so I took him the car. He checked it out and decided to drop the oil pan while I was there. First thing he said when the pan hit the floor was "Tell Greg to stop useing Quaker State oil" I thought he was joking and went home and told Greg. He said that car had never had anything other than Quaker State in it. [:0][:0] By the way, the engine had regular oil changes and was well kept. Lees than 80,000 miles and there wasnt a good bearing in it.

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SmilinSam
I'd never seen this before. Its about just like 100% silicone sealer when its set up. There was a groove cut in the stuff where the dipper had cut through it. Inside of the bluck , the underside of the piston and all alse was just caked with this yuk. So bad I really don't even want to offer the block for sale. Personally I use Penzoil or Valvoline mixed with some duralube. I've used Quaker state once or twice for oil changes but always got penzoil back in it after 25 hours again. Hope that hasnt done anything like this to that engine I used it in. I was wondering why the dipstick showed it full and when I draines it only a couple of cups of oil came out.|)

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PatRarick
I would imagine one benefit of oil like that is...no leaks? Several years ago, a customer (who is well known for meticulously caring for his equipment) brought me an old Briggs engine that he wanted to restore. It originally ran a milking machine in his barn. The engine had been sitting on his shelf for about forty years, since electriciy had become available to them. It wasn't locked up, but was VERY stiff. When I tore it down, the inside of the engine was clean as a whistle, but the oil was thicker than 90W gear oil. It was actually sticky to the touch. This particular engine had an oil pump which pumped the engine oil into a little trough for the dipper on the connecting rod. In that trough, the oil was solid. It had to be chipped out. It was like the trough had been filled with epoxy or fiberglass resin. The strange thing to me, was that this oil was CLEAN. It looked like new oil that had somehow "set up". After I got the bulk of this oil scraped and chipped out, I tried to clean the remaining residue. The parts washer would not do it. Gasoline made it slimy, but would not remove it. It took a soaking in the carb cleaner tank, plus spray carb cleaner and a brass wire brush to clean it completely. Pat

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D-17_Dave
I just rebuilt a4 cyl John deere power plant and it was blown from not changeing the oil What was left in the oil pan was this stuff, it was black jello. Remember that oil is made up of natural petroleum based products that breack down after time. This is the majer cause of needing an oil change as the oil breaks down it also gets contaminated with combustion byproduct. This byproduct dyluts the oil and as the oil breaks down I think it kinda evaporates this byproduct is whats left. As it cools it congeals and if left in it dries out and becomes what Sam has. To me my experiance with Quaker State is a good natural lubricant that didn't have all the additives to stabilize the oil to prevent it from "evaporating" to prevent it from doing this, therefor it got a bad rap. They have since gone to a different mix. But like I said i think it's just byproduct and just needs cleaning out.

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JimDk
I live near the Quaker State "oil patch". The crude oil from this area is parafin based. The old formula would solidify in engines if not changed regularly. It was really bad in engines used for light duty and cars used for short trips. The farmers who used QS oil learned to drain for an oil change after a days work in the field and the engine was still hot. Even under ideal use you could expect to find a thin layer of parafin inside your engine. I hope this helps to explain the gunk that is found in some engines.

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Tom_Byrne
I bought a 1976 Ford pickup a couple of years ago- same kind of buildup. The head were so caked up I only had one dump hole open for oil to get back to the crankcase. My mechanic/buddy told me the same thing, except he said ALL Pennsylvania crude was like that. Between the head and valve cover I filled up a large coffee can with sludge- it actually built up in the valve cover around the rockers!

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RayS
My father bought a new truck in 1980 and when he decided to pull the engine in 1985 because of soft lobes on the camshaft we found this also. He always used Quaker state and changed the oil every 3,000 miles like he was suppose to. There was 2 to 3 inches of this stuff in the lifter valley and you would have to beat it out with a hammer and chisle. RayS

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BigSix
My buddy's '80 F-150, 302, 4x4 had this annoying condition where the oil press. would drop and he had to routinely jack up the engine in order to remove the pan and scrape out the "sludge." I never saw the stuff, but I assumed that this was just one more "benefit" of the 302 (I'm a 300 c.i. "Big Six" fan myself, and never saw a stock 302 I liked). Now I'm wondering if I should subtract this particular "charm" of the 302 (routinely requiring the oil pan to be manually desludged) from the 302's list of attributes. Maybe the 302 is only guilty of having poor gas mileage, poor torque and poor durability, in comparison to the 300 Big Six? That is some nasty sludge, Sam.... Maybe, if you know someone getting a car engine boiled out, they could include your block? Just a suggestion. Peter

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D-17_Dave
Bigsix, I've worked on lots of Fords with this oil problem. No matter what kind of oil used. I think the temp. on these engines was a little high and contributed to the Ford problem. My dad had a 302 in a town car that the slude would stop up the oil pump and ring the pump drive shaft off evry 5000 miles or so. I finally rebuilt it just to clean the engine out. Ran synthetic in it after that with no more problems.

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Roy
I used QS oil for around 40 years (until I switched to Mobile 1) without any of the problems described and always had good engine life and clean engines. Pennsylvania oils have a better natural viscosity index and do not break down like other dino oils. The sludging problems some have had are related to lack of oil changes and/or engine operating temperatures. That is why engine oils have progressed in Service Classification from SA to SJ (or whatever they're up to now). My experience,

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SmilinSam
quote:
Originally posted by MPH
Looks to me like them Quakers missed something in the meaning of 'refineing'. Thats nasty lookin.
Hey Marty, with this stuff you have the same characteristics of oil at -50 but without the freezin temps:D

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BigSix
Dave-17: Very interesting, especially since you have the "before and after" results, as opposed to just one side of the story, like my buddy. Did you say that the drive shaft to the oil pump would actually sever? That's pretty wild.... Marty: You're bad...
quote:
Looks to me like them Quakers missed something in the meaning of 'refineing'. Thats nasty lookin.
but you make me laugh--thanks! Peter

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Guest
An uncle of mine owned an old John Deere AR, when he rebuilt it it was caked with the same stuff. However for what its worth, gramps thought it was due to the fact that the oil was never changed and oil was added as needed, when it got a low throw in a quart, dont pull the plug just add. Furthermore, some farmers bought whatever oil they could afford, what was cheapest or on sale.

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