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bowlake

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bowlake
Can anyone tell me how to get the oil cooler on a a/c 720 to look like new. I am in the process of restoring. Oil cooler in good shape but it is loaded with years of dirt and oil. Degreaser won't get it looking like new. Is there another product or way to clean aluminum.?

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D-17_Dave
If you have it off, don't cover the inlet& outlet as the air inside will expand. Place the cooler on an old oven pan and place it in the oven on low heat for a few minuets. just long enough to heat it up good. Then remove it to an open area and soak it good with oven cleaner. Wash and rinse. If that don't do it take it to the carwash and get the high pressure wash on it. This should help. Dave.

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markpogue
Go to your local heating and air supply store and get some coil cleaner. It is acid or alkli based and will make the metal look new. It will actually cause the dirt to boil out from between the fins. Use caution, gloves, and eye protection, and read the directions.;)

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BLT
I hope you have the good sense to plug the inlet and outlet of the core. If you haven't you might as well scrap the core and get a new one. Just imagine what all those high potent cleaners are doing to make it look good on the outside will loosen up stuff and contaminate the inside. Flushing the core is not a 100% guarantee that it will come out clean. If the insides are intact, it is important to remember to hook your oil cooler hoses up the exact way you took them off. Hot oil comes out of the transmission, passes thru the cooler and then to the resivoir. From there it is filtered and sent back to the transmission. The transmission over the years will sent out particles which might or might not pass thru the cooler. Some don't make it and get hung up in the tubulators. Reversing the oil flow can loosen this junk up and send it back to the transmission unfiltered. Hydro transmissions have next to zero tolerance for contaminents.

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thedaddycat
I would be very hesitant to use oven cleaner on aluminum. Try a radiator shop, they might be able to boil it out when they do the next radiator. I find that coming to a shop with a coffee or two helps to "grease the wheels" for getting something so small done for cheap.... or even free!!

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bowlake
You all have good idea's. I am looking forward to posting pic's of this a/c 720. Every nut, bolt and part has been sand blasted and painted. It would not look right with that old dirty oil cooler. Thanks Again.

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Leroy
The Heating and Cooling (HVAC) folks have to clean evaporators while they are installed an while they are inside businesses and homes. The stuff they use works as good as gojo does on your hands. Most oven cleaners will eat aluminum, Most ovens are steel and with nickle plating on the racks.

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D-17_Dave
Didn't think about the aluminium thing when I thought about the oven cleaner. Thanks for the corection. Not used to anything new enough to have aluminium on it. As for the lines, aren't the coolers on these just a loop tube. Not a core full of small passeges like a rad. Wouldn't think much could get traped anywhere in this setup. But Bob is correct in that these hyd. systems won't take much contamination. These pumps and motors will self destruct over the size of a grain of sand in them.

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Leroy
I believe the 720 20 horse Or 19.5 that engine may have a aluminum finned cooler in the back like this engine. As in this picture. from http://www.repowereng.com/repowereng/images/altima_right.JPG

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PatRarick
It may take a LOT of it, but spray carb cleaner should do it without damaging the aluminum. Definately plug the inlet and outlet first. Soak it down a couple of times just to soften the goo before trying to clean it. Once it is well softened, it should rinse out with hot water. A pressure washer or car wash might work, but I am not real familiar with how heavy the cooling fins are. I would be very careful with that. I have seen air conditioner condensers and radiators have their fins folded flat by the pressure. Pat

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vfd702
We use a product at work to clean condensor coils on AC units called CON COIL. It is pink,it is smelly,it is NASTY. But it sure works. Will just lift the dirt out. Paint also will go away. BE SURE YOU FLUSH ALL OF IT OFF when done. ken

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Leroy
Con-Coil™ is an acid based foaming brightener and cleaner for finned, air-cooled condenser coils. It's penetrating, surfactant aided, foaming action lifts obstructing contaminants such as bugs, cotton-wood, grass, lint, dirt and oxides from coils. Con-Coil™ can also be used for cleaning electronic air filters.

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