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comet66

Just Fill'em with w/w anti-freeze

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comet66
"You want more rear weight? just fill the tires with ww anti-freeze";) Well that is good advice and works great.:) But what a tedious job that was!:p 5.5 gal. each in 23X10.50-12 ags. I new it was going to be slow trying to get fluid and air to move different directions at the same time through that little hole. But Holy Moly even with the NAPA tool it took forever. According to my bathroom scale the WW antifreeze is right at 8 lbs. per gal. (but I know it reads high, it must:I), so that brings the wheel assemblies up to 75 lbs. each and that should help with the loader.:D Now all I need is the new power stearing cylinder to arrive and I can finish mounting the loader.:D:D

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Kokomo
I put antifreeze in a set of rear tires before I knew that it can kill a dog with a small amount. I have had two leaks over the years with anifreeze in these tires. Yes, it works great; however, my dogs are very important to me. I am considering the use of windshield fluid, as I assume it will not effect animals. Bob

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thedaddycat
They make WW fluid with a bittering agent now, makes it even less likable to kids and animals both from what I gather. Make sure you use winter formula fluid for freeze protection...

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KSever
Removed antifreeze (glycol) from the tires and rims I bought last year and found the insides of the rims were rotted away. I had to cut the valve stems off the rims since they were rusted to the rims. Good Luck with yours.

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ikipp
What about using RV antifreeze. The type used to protect the potable water systems. It is cheap, about $1.99 gallon and not supposed to be harmful to humans. Thusly, it may not harm animals if some leaks out of the tires.

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comet66
That would be the way to do tubeless tires, but with tubes you're left no choice but to be patient. Pour and burp, then repeat. My gradma always said "There is only one way to get patients. That is to wait for it."

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IronPony
I agree with Ira. Use RV anti-freeze. It is safe for human and anamal consumption (and OK for your septic system.:D) I also recommend using tubes to keep from rotting out your rims. I don't load my tires because I am worried about ruts in my lawn. I now have a second set of rear rims and tires and think I may put chains and weights on them and load them for winter use. Dan

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Agricola
Interesting point was mentioned to me regarding weights. When you use weights rather than fluid the axle has the stop the rotational movement of the tire, wheel and weights. Wheel weights can add quite a bit of rotational inertia to the system and cause premature axle failure. I think I would go with the fluid filled idea before I would use wheel weights. No added rotational inertia, only linear.

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