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iweld

I've been waitin' 30 years!

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mwells
I've got no idea. I have a ten horse briggs I'm overhauling and it look just about as bad as that. How the heck do they live in there when it gets over 100 degrees in there when you useing it?

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Charlieson
Ive seen mice nest's in Kohlers, Wiscosins, Tecumseh's and etc. You name the mice will get into it. Anything left sitting over the winter stands a chance for mice. I even had a mouse living in a computer at work. When I opened the case I thought that someone had poured something all over the Motherboard. Upon closer inspection I found a mouse house and mouse droppings. One of the expansion slots was uncovered and the mouse moved right in. ddh

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IronPony
ddh, I'll still go with Kohlers. They start in the winter to keep those mice out. LOL Had a mouse nest on top of the engine in my new 1988 Sable that was in an attached garaged of a new house at the time. You really can't get away from those critters. Dan

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Brent_Baumer
I'm with Marty on the pet door and cat idea.

I don't have any problems with mice. Had a stray feral Tom figure out how the door works, but trapped him in one night and took care of the problem. I worry that a skunk or a coon is gonna figure it out one day. I saw a skunk up close and personal near the shop early one morning. It acted like it could care less about me. Don't know if that is good or bad. It went into the wood pile and I haven't seen it around since last fall. I was afraid it was living in there but maybe not if I'm lucky. Brent

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Guest
Brent a simple "cats only" sign should keep the skunks out.....

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Guest
That's definitely a nice start to a garage, my solution was a cover-It and lots of Mouthballs in regards to mice.

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iweld
Well everyone I talked to said I should go with the radiant heat. I will need to cut some corners elsewhere to pay for it. Right now I plan to just leave the tubing sit until I get the garage done. (and get the cash reserves back up) I started last fall digging out the fence row and footer with my 9020 loader/back-hoe. It sure beats a shovel! I went 40" deep with the depth for a 8" X 16" footer. Laid all the 8" block myself. Seven courses. UGH. The styrofoam is 1-1/2" thick. The pex tubing is eBay 1/2" ID. 1000 feet. I made 8 loops. I suppose this might be a few more than I had to, but I'm sure it will do the job. I plan on 4-1/2" of fiberglass reinforced concrete. I will post progress when time allows.

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Guest
Jason, your project really looks good. How much weight are you designing the floor to hold and what are your thoughts about it settling? Will the styrofoam compress? I am curious of the over all dimensions also.

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fireballv8
Floor heat is not fair to those with cold slabs, I'm calling the ACLU and your local concrete union to complain. If you don't have cats and dogs in the shop, Get some of those big bags of rat bait and throw a couple of handfulls around the shop every month, and keep it up under some stuff you don't move. I that problem once and they ate ever bit of wiring the existed. Good luck with that shop, your going to love it.

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iweld
As for the weight bearing capabilities of the concrete, I haven't heard any bad things. I have a friend in town who used the fiberglass reinforcement in his slab outside, and it still looks good after 6+ years. (that's just an example for the fiberglass, not the styrofoam) As for the styrofoam settling. I don't think this will be a problem because the loads put on the cement will be distributed widely as long as the cement stays in one piece. Ask MPH what the guys in Alaska do when they install radiant heat in a shop. As for not being fair to those with cold slabs. If you can stand your floor to be 2" higher, You too can have in floor heat. All it takes is money.;)

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MPH
The 'lastest' way of doing it up here is a layer of sand, foam, sand, pipe, sand then concrete. Haven't heard of any foam comprestion problems yet, theres a million truckloads of it under the burried oil pipeline.

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