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ehertzfeld

no spark

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ehertzfeld
Ok here is the story. On my Broadmoor project, it has no spark. I can feel it but caint see it. I tryed to get the fly wheel off to check the points, but it just wont budge. I bought one of thouse convertion kits and installed it. Well same thing, feel it but caint see it. My question is could the motor not be spinning fast enough? How meny RPM's does it take to make spark? Or is my coil bad? If the coil is bad, can you still get the four hole coils? All the ones I've seen are the newer two hole. I have two on my other projects tractors but I dont want to use them unless I have to. Any info would be greatly appericated. Thanks Elon

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rjgoth
I think you should find a way to get the flywheel off, make sure you use the proper puller. The first thing you might want to do is try a new plug. Next replace the points since they are the least expensive, also check the air gap between the flywheel magnets and the coil, also make sure the flywheel magnets are free of rust. Id go ahead and replace the points regardless. If that doesnt work, try a new or different coil. Good luck man, Ryan

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ehertzfeld
Ryan, there is a new plug in it now. The magnets are clean and I used the gap strip that came with the conversion kit. As far as the fly wheel, the bolts have to be 1/4inch and only two can be used. "not the best planning on Briggs part" I had the puller on it with pressure for a week. I keeped spraying blaster in. After a few days I tryed a small tourch with the puller. Im kinda scared to ruin somthing. The chank isnt that thick. I also dont want to melt the seal. The points are now not being used. I cut them out and used a solid state. I can feel somthing! just dont get it. Elon

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BLT
If you are using this puller and pulling aginst the loosened crankshaft nut as shown, there is nothing better. The puller is a very sturdy unit. More brute force is required (grin).

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ehertzfeld
quote:
Originally posted by maxtorman1234
From that picture, it looks like the nut is still on the shaft. On all our Kohlers, we just remove the nut, home made puller always gets it off.
The pic is just for show. The nut was off wille I was trying to pull the flywheel off.

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UCD
Elon Put the puller on and tighten it as tight as you can then take a hammer and hit the puller center bolt a real sharp blow. Then tighten the puller as tight as you can get it and hit it again keep doing this and it will come off.

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KSever
I had the puller on my 7 HP Briggs for about 2 days with pressure on it till I decided to tap the end of the puller with my sludge hammer a few times (well maybe just a little harder than a tap) when I heard a loud pop and the flywheel came right off.

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ehertzfeld
I realy appericate all the advice and ideas, but I think we've goten away from my problem. I am no longer looking to get the fly wheel off. Im more concerned why the solid state ignition isnt giving me spark. I think over the weekend I'm going to try to take off a coil from another broadmoor, and try it. I wish there was a way to bench teast coils. Hopfully that will work. Thanks Elon

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slb04786
Elon, Have you checked the key switch and associated wires. I rebuilt the 16HP B&S that on my 7116 and after re-installing it I thought the timing was off. Pulled the engine off and rechecked the timing of the crank and cam gears. Checked ok so I put it back together and re-installed. Same problem, engine wouldn't rev up, missing terrible, spark was intermttent. I finally removed the kill wire that goes from the magnetron to the key switch. Engine started running like it was new. Somewhere in the switch or the wiring I have a partial short on that "kill" wire. Seeing as you have had problems with critters in the past is it possible they got in under the dash? I found a huge mouse nest under mine, behind the gas tank. I cleaned it out and as soon as it warms up enough I'll check the wiring for shorts. For the time being I leave the kill wire disconnected until I want to shut the engine down then I just touch it to the post it usually is connected to to kill the spark. It's still very intermittent. I hooked it up the last time I used the tractor and it worked fine. My son went out to move the tractor out of the garage the other day and it wouldn't start. He removed the wire from the post and it started right up. Sorry for the long post but I thought the details were important. Hope it helps you or someone.

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ambler
Elon, Spend the money and get the Briggs puller. Tighten in up and take a rubber or plastic hammer and tap around the back of the flywheel. It lets go all of a sudden.

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PatRarick
Haven't made one yet, but saw the plans for a "coil tester". This applies to Briggs only. An old, smaller horsepower horizontal shaft engine with the piston, rod, and camshaft removed. One with points, so both types of coil can be tested. Install a pulley and drive with a small, electric motor. A gear reduction engine would be ideal since you wouldn't need a bulkier pulley reduction from the electric motor to the engine crankshaft. You need to have a hole in the side of the block to manually oil the crankshaft bearings occasionally. For safety from the spinning flywheel, the blower housing is used as a shield by cutting an opening to allow installation and removal of the coil. I thought an alternative would be to use a vertical shaft engine. With the piston removed, the camshaft could be left in (without push rods), to drive the oil splasher. Fill the crankcase with oil and there would be no need to manually oil the bearings. With this method, you would need to install the cylinder head, gasket, and an old spark plug to close off the crankcase. Pat

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dogboy
To test the original coil,you will need an ohmmeter.connect it to the plug lead and ground it to the coil,it should read between 2,500 and 5,000 ohms,if its less than 2,500 its shorted out,over 5,000 its an open circuit,also check that the engine ground is good. i had this same problem ,it turn out to be a brand new condenser,not B&S,that was no good.i got genuine B&S point and condenser set,junked the Bosch plug and its fine now.

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simplicity707
I checked the to see if my original for my '64 Broadmoor had spark. I was told to hold end of the wire and turn the engine over with my hand, well i'll never do that again. She had spark alright, shot straight up my arm and into my shoulder. It was tingly for awhile. The spark also jumps fromt the wire to spark plug. It's big bright and blue. Now I just need to try and get it to fire.

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ehertzfeld
Well I took the coil to Napa to try to get a new one, but they dont have a listing for my engine. They did tell me if I got the B.S. number they could cross referance it. Well I tryed it again and now I have spark! I guess threatening it worked! LOL But Still dosnt want to start though. Must be a carb adjustment now. Thanks for all the advice Elon

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