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Mike

Excessive lift arm wear on 916H

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Mike
I am getting alot of wear on the lift arm and lift rod on my 916H, used the snowblade this winter and a ton of mikey bucket work last fall. My plan of attack is to weld up the oblong hole on the arm and redrill the hole, then I will either get a new lift arm piece or weld that up as well. My question is, will I gain alot by bushing the lift arm hole and has anyone done this? Or is there a better fix. Thanks, Mike

After a little club research, it appears that I am using this lift rod backwords. I wonder if that could be the reson for excess wear.

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comet66
If you are going to bush it any way, which I think is a good idea, why not just drill it out and bush without welding first? I can see building the rod back up with weld, but to close the whole then redrill seems like an unnessary step.

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rs07
I have the same problem on my Allis 916H also. I received the tractor like that though. It was previously owned by a local school district. The tractor has a 46" dozer blade on it. I was thinking about just replacing both the lift arm and rod.

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MPH
Just saw a post last night with an idea I like and plan to try on a few of my oblong holes. Insert a brass fitting, weld around it to fill the hole, then remove the bushing as the weld will not stick to it. Thinking about tring it with hard surface rod.

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SimpleMan
This is only an observation, I have not actually tried it, but... I've noticed the same wear starting on my lift arm also. It seems to me that part of the problem has to do with the fact the lift rod is mounted so that only one side of the arm receives pressure. If one could come up with a modification so that even pressure was exerted on both sides of the rod, perhaps this problem could be lessened. Maybe having the rod bent, and a clevis placed on the end of the rod which is placed on the lift arm would help?? As far as putting in a bushing...if the bushing is harder than the steel it's being put into, won't the same wear happen if nothing else is changed? I'm on a learning curve when it comes to metal work. These are things to think about...I'm sure someone out there would be able to validate or disprove my theories. Gord:)

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stevenj
Your lift arm looks exactly like the one on my B210. I've used a front blade for about ten years to push snow and never inspected it until last year at which point I found the wear. My lift rod had a groove like yours but was about halfway through the rod. The other end of the lift rod that attaches to the blade hitch had absolutely no wear. The hole in the lift arm on the hitch was nice and round. There's a reason for that. The width of the lift arm on the hitch is roughly twice as wide as the lift arm on the tractor. Since the load in the lift rod is equal on both ends, the increased width results in lower stress (unit loading) which results in less wear. On the tractor lift arm the wear is being caused by the higher unit loading due to the thinner lift arm. Also, because the lift arm length is shorter, there is more relative angular rotation between the lift rod and the lift arm, which also causes abrasive/rubbing wear. Couple the higher loading stress with the higher relative angular motion and you get the elongation of the hole and the wear in the rod. When I noticed my elongation I measured a couple of "newer" tractors that did not seem to have any wear and if memory serves me, the hole measured about 9/16" whereas the lift rod is 1/2", so you start out with basically a line contact between the OD of the rod and the ID of the lift hole. As the two parts wear, the area of contact increases which helps to reduce the unit loading. My situation has been with a 42" non-tripping front blade. I would expect that owners of snowblowers or the JB buckets would have more of a problem simply due to the increased weight of the front attachment.

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thedaddycat
My JBJr. came with clevises on both ends of the lift rod, which help distribute the load evenly across the lift points. If you have to fix the lift arms once every what, 15 or 20 years due to using it a lot, so what? I wish a lot of other things gave that long of service..... Here's one for you, drill out the hole big enough to allow a pipe stub to be fit in. Put in the stub of pipe, but make it just a tad wider than the lift arm. Weld a big washer or piece of flat stock to increace the width of the lift arm in the area where the attachment hole is. Now the force bears on a wider area. I measured the lift arm on a 2012 and it was .302" thick. Even adding 1/16" more would be a 20% gain and a clevis would have room for it. If you use clevis ends and don't weld the pipe in, the pipe stub becomes the bushing and is both cheap and easy to replace.

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jlasater
how about a larger heim joint on the end bolted to the arm. That way there is no wear whatsoever on the arm itself. You'd have to thread or adapt the heim to screw onto the lift rod.

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Mike
HubbardRA and the daddycat win the cupie doll. I took a 3/8"ips galvanized nipple, drilled the center out to 1/2". I then dremmeled the oblong hole to fit the outside diameter of the nipple. Cut the nipple to 3/16" wider than the lift arm and away we go. I also used a large washer behind the lift arm to help keep the bushing from sliding inward. Total repair time 35 minutes. I would have used a brass nipple ,but just used what I had on hand. This is a working tractor, so no pretty paint jobs.

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HubbardRA
That's what I was talking about. I've used this technique many times. Fixed a worn Kohler governor arm by drilling it, putting the head end of a nail through the hole, then swageing it with a hammer. Then I drilled a new hole and re-inserted the carb linkage. I have also been using flat bar as the linkage on my blade instead of a rod. I put a bolt through the hole in the end of the bar, screw a nut up loosely against the bar, put the bolt through the hole in the arm and put a second nut on the other side and tighten. This way the arm doesn't wear at all. All wear is in the bolt and the bar. The bar is easily replaced with another if it wears a lot or can be repaired the way that you fixed the arm. Just my way of doing things.

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