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Brent's 16 HP no-power learning experience / need


TomF

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Good_Ole_JR
One thing i found out with my 3212h,3212v and my 14hp montgomert wards built by gilson. All of these tractors have either a 14 or 12 hp b&s motor on them. I have found out that when the points condenser goes bad on them it will seem like you are having carb problems. the tractors severly lacked power and you could not accelerate the engines. One evening while I was mowing my 2&1/2 acres, my 3212v would not take fuel and just started chugging. I removed the carb and could not find anything wrong,blew back through the fuel line,checked filters, checked for water and did every thing i could do fuel wise. Then it just hit me......I remembered what happened with the wards and the 3212h....I went to my tool box and got my spare condenser and replacedthe old one. The tractor fired right up and purred like a kitten after that. The faulty condenser doesn't happen that often and it had just slipped my mind but all the symptoms led me to believe that iI had fuel system troubles.
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Hi Tom and Peter, Both Briggs and Kohler have manuals for there engines that can be bought as most small engine repair shops or most any garden tractor dealerships. You might even check your local library for books on small engines as I know my library carries some. The carb adjustments are as follows- First- the high speed or needle valve adjustment screw is located at the bottom of the float bowl. Close this all the way clock wise being very carefull not to close it to tight or you may damage it. Then open it by turning it counter clock wise 1-1/2 turns. Second- is the idle valve that is for slow engine speed adjustment- this is the valve located just to the left of the air cleaner. Close this the same as you did the high speed valve and also be carefull when doing so. Once closed reopen it 1/2 to 3/4 turns. Third- start your engine and let it warm up for about 10 min. Next is the final adjustments. Forth- You now want the engine to run at about 1200 rpm or 1/4 throttle speed "fast idle". Turn the high speed valve in clock wise until the engine just starts to miss which will be a lean mixture. Now turn the valve the other direction slowly until it starts to run smooth. Now keep turning the same direction until it starts to run rough again. Now you will have to turn the valve in so that it is pretty much centered between the 2 rough settings that you had untill it runs smooth again. The point being is you want the valve to be in between the lean and rich mixture for best performace. Five- Do the same with the idle valve which is the screw closest to the air cleaner but with the engine idleing and repeat doing it the same way untill it runs and idles smooth again. Six- Now you want to run the engine at or about 1/4 throttle speed or fast idle again. Now give your engine full throttle"doing so quickly like flooring the gas pedel in your car and releaseing it" and see if the engine will accelerate without hesitation. If it hesitates then turn the high speed screw counter clockwise just abit more with will richen the mixture and see if the hesitation is gone. If not repeat this step. If your engine misses at idle try fine tuneing the idle speed valve turning it first one way and back the other untill it idles smooth. "BEFORE DOING ANY ADJUSTMENTS ON THE CARBURATOR MAKE SURE TO CLEAN THE AIR FILTER" There is another screw that is located on the throttle shaft or near the center of the carb closest to you that is for adjusting the engine idle speed. This is not a needle valve and your engine hopefully is running at a desired speed. If not you may adjust this screw to change the engine idle speed either counter clockwise for slower or clockwise for faster engine idle. But you don't want your engine to idle at a speed to which would be to slow to let the clutch out without the engine stalling. Some people idle the engines down to slow and then they will over heat from not enough air flow from the flywheel not turning fast enough. Adjusting a carburator is almost like fine tuneing a clock so you have to be patient in doing so for the best results. I hope this helps and like always anyone "please" correct me or "add" to my reply-better to be corrected then to have someone misinformed. Good Luck with our club to the both of you, >>->happyjack<-<<
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FiremanRon
One more thing to remember is that since you are making the settings with no load on the engine, you might need to enrich the mixture a bit from the ideal smooth idle setting. These carbs are not as sophisticated as a car, so you have to set them for the anticipated load. When I set my Troybilt tiller to purr, it had no power to till. When I opened up the mixture a little more, it doesn't idle as nice, but it sure digs the dirt. It takes some trial and error to get it just right.
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Everyone, I wanted to let you know how much I am learning from the discussion. I have 4 B-series tractors and several lack power; one I purchased recently in a package deal doesn't run for lack of knowledge on how to diagnose the problem (I was told it might be the timing gear by the former owner, who was guessing. Can't get it to run evenly, if at all). Can anyone tell me the best resource for the older Brigg's engines for the proper (factory) carburetor settings, and perhaps other resources on diagnosing engine problems? Are there any good books on small engine repair on the market you could recommend? My 11-year-old and I would love to learn, and he's a sponge when it comes to this stuff. Thanks, all, for your help. Thanks, Kent, for creating a GREAT community!!! Tom Feldpausch and Peter
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