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Engine Replacement


tckiser

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Hello All, I am new to the site (neat site BTW!) and I was looking for some info about replacing an engine on an AC B-10 tractor. I do repair work at my home part time and I sorta' backed into this deal. I'm not sure how far these folks want to go as to repairing this old tractor but the engine and just about everything else on the tractor is worn out. The old engine is a B&S 243431 and needs almost everything, including a new carb. I personally don't think its worth fixing but I'll let the customer decide after I've made some cost estimates. I can rebuild what I have but it won't be cheap. I was concerned about the drive being taken off the flywheel side on this app; didn't know if any other engines are available that use it. Anyway, thanks for any help in advance. I've worked on small engines for a good many years but now I do mainly diesels in construction and ag equipment so I'm not up on a lot of the new stuff out there today. Tommy K
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First of all the B/S 243431 is one of the best engines they ever made. I have one that has been rebuilt twice and still stock bore. Replacement is the problems if you are doing it as a business. It takes some time to change and some modifications or work arounds. This means man-hours. Most of the older cast iron B/S engines have the same bolt pattern on the flywheel and will bolt to the driveshaft. You may have to make spacers to mate up. Will have the usual problems, throttle fuel line, wiring, etc. Newer engines usually have bendix starters with alternators. This will require rewiring. Fortunately most of flat bottom engines with mounting flanges will bolt on. May have to reverse oil pan and drill hole for oil drain. If you run a shop, you should be able to determine what is needed by close inspection of the old and new engines. Nothing difficult, just keep the engine sitting flat like the older one. Don't tilt it toward the rear. The joints take care of the driveshaft alignment. Your client will probably have a pretty good bill either way. Tell him to just ship the tractor to me and forget it. I only have three and need a few more.
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Thanks Rod for your info. I am mainly concerned with the flywheel/driveshaft arrangement; the other stuff is simple. I was hoping somebody could tell me what specific model Briggs or maybe Kohler engine would fit up. The old engine can be rebuilt but its going to need boring, new guides, maybe new seats, the carburetor is worn out (throttle shaft) and all the other related stuff. Unless you were restoring it, I just can't see spending that much money on it with the expectation of being reliable. The tractor itself is not much better from what I can see. Anyway, I'll see what she wants to do! Tommy
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First, Welcome to the club. Try the following site. I think they offer one of the best selections of small engines. Some good prices too! They may have what you are looking for. www.smallenginewarehouse.com
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First, this a site of a bunch of people that use these old tractors everyday because we think they so much better than what is on the market today and they are well worth putting some money in to. Second, the drive from the the fly wheel side works great! Now, yes there are Kohler engines that will bolt up with only minor alterations to electrical and maybe some adjusting for the oil drain. But, most of the members here seem to like the B&S engines better than the Kohlers. I like both. Good luck! OH! :Dyou are welcome to join the club and get all the small engine and Allis Chalmers and Simplicity tractor info you would ever want. it is $10 well spent. Dan
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Tommy, I have a 61 Wards (Simplicity 725. In the time I have had it, I have had a B/S 243431 on it that bolted right up, a K301 Kohler from a Cub Cadet (not supposed to fit, but made it work), and now a K321 Kohler that bolted right up. The Cub cadet engine needed a custom made driveshaft adapter, since the Cub Cadet uses a different bolt pattern on the flywheel than the standard engines so I made a custom adapter, and the oil pan needed spacers and new holes drilled through the chassis. Both the the B/S and the K321 had the correct bolt pattern for the driveshaft and the oil pans bolted directly to the chassis. For the driveshaft I just get bolts that are the right length and either make spacers from tubing or a stack of washers. As you notice, I am talking about older flathead engines. I don't know much about the newer units. All three of the tractors that I currently have are using some type of these homemade spacers. None have the original engine. Only one engine has a factory spacer, but not for that chassis, so it also needed some spacing. Just be sure to use at least grade 5 and preferably grade 8 bolts. The actual load on those bolts is not as much as most people think, so this type of modification works fine. The Wards served as a tractor puller for almost 15 years. You don't get any more driveshaft loading than that.
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landlord2110
http://www.smallenginewarehouse.com/ProductList.asp?Category=Engine&Supplier=Briggs check this web site. I have a 243431 bought in 1972 after the agnes flood and it still purrs like a kitten. thats 30 years old and it gets used alot. this is a great engine.
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Don't get me wrong folks, I think the older stuff like this works better too! I have a 1950 Caterpillar D6 bulldozer that I wouldn't trade for anything new; it just has "character" that the new stuff lacks. I'm just trying to get the owner a reliable piece of equipment for a somewhat reasonable price; I'm not looking to make a great profit from it because this is more a hobby than anything else. The old tractor has been sitting for about 2-3 years and the last person to work on it really didn't have a clue as to what they were doing. I think we will probably rebuild the old Briggs engine for the sake of not having to change much. I've worked on a lot of these over the years and they are a very good engine. This one has just been terribly abused. Question for the group though. This engine had what appeared to be a 12 volt battery ignition system added to it. It also still has the magneto coil on it with the plug wire tied over out of the way. My assumption is the coil went bad and someone didn't want to pull the engine off to change it so they just added a battery ignition coil and some wiring. I think I'll probably just put the Briggs Magnetron coil on it while I have it off and forget the points. Did any of these machines have 12V ignition? Thanks everybody for your help!!! I probably can't return the favor easily but I work for an industrial engine distributor that handles Kubota, Perkins, Deutz and a good number of other new and remanufactured engines. We also have a diesel fuel injection shop. If anybody needs any help with that kind of stuff maybe I can contribute. Tommy K
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