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JeffG

Noise

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JeffG
Since Cheap Harry brought up the subject of noisy tractors, I thought that I would take a minute to talk about the hazards of noise. I am an Industrial Hygienist with the State of Ohio. Some of my duties are to perform air and noise monitoring on employees working in industry and construction. Similar in scope to OSHA, but strictly on a consultative basis (make recommendations on findings and levy no fines). Anyway, everyone should be using either ear plugs or muffs when mowing, weedeating, etc. Hearing loss can occur at levels as low as 80 decibels. Like anything, some people are more sensitive than others. To give you an idea, most of todays automobiles operate in the 80 decibel range (outside the car). Sitting on the seat of my AC 720 with the Woods finish mower engaged registers a steady 99 decibels. My Husky 51 chainsaw operates in the 108 - 112 decibel range. Continued exposure (without hearing protection) to anything over 90 decibels will almost certainly cause hearing loss. We all lose a certain amount of hearing with age anyway, no sense in compounding or rushing the problem. Once you lose it, you'll never get it back. Always wear hearing protection when operating your gasoline powered equipment. It's cheap and simple insurance. Just my 2 cents worth! Jeff

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BenB
I can't agree more with Jeff! I work in an Acoustics Lab for a company that designs mufflers for everything from Leaf Blowers to Large Industrial Silencers. And for those of us that use impact wrenchs and air drills etc., we should also be wearing ear protection. I can say that my hearing is not as good as it was 10 years ago,from running bolts down with the impact and having it ring thru the pipes and being around the engines running in the test cells. Needless to say I wear ear protection all the time now. That's my two cent's Howard

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Del
Hi everyone: Well as long as the subject of personal safety is being discussed, I'll add my 2 cents worth. I'm an optometrist. I have the honor about once a week of taking a foreign body out of someone's eye. Grinding, hammering, sawing, looking up from under a car etc. all can result in foreign bodies being thrown or dropped onto an eye. If you don't want your eyes, you can probably sell them. There are lots of people who would dearly love to have just one. I have a sign in my office by a pair of goggles that reads, "Be Wise, Protect Your Eyes". Actually, I enjoy removing foreign bodies from eyes but the patients really don't. So I always wear glasses in the shop, mowing, weed wacking etc. I really do not want to be on the side of the patient. Hopefully, all of you will wear ear, eye and sun protection so you can see, hear and live to enjoy those great Simple Tractors. And remember unlike ears and skin, it often only takes one mistake to completely lose an eye. Once that happens, it is gone. Not good. Take care. Del

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Guest
Ok, I'll add my 2 cents also. I'm a production supervior for a large TV manufacture. I actually supervise the noisy end of the line. So Jeff your another one of those guys that double the paper work that I'm required to do. But all kidding aside. I just brought home a couple pair of ear pluggs today because the 716H is a little noisy after mowing for ab out 3 hrs non-stop. Jeff does have a point.

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Good_Ole_JR
Thanks for the reminders everyone! It is certianly to our advantage to learn from the experience of other professionals before we damage ourselves! Although we have lift tables to work on I still do a lot of "knee bending" on concrete. A friend with many more years of doing the same tipped me to cushion it somehow, as he found out later by experiencing knee pain from bending down on the concrete for 60+ years -too late. I always carry a shop towel (rag) any way, so I wad it up as a sort of pillow for the knee to rest on.

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