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2 questions - 10HP B&S


clyde

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The 2100 I just got had not been started in about 5 years, so I pulled the engine and removed the covers before trying to start it. (Of course, there was a large mouse nest). The 10HP has an 'extra' piece I haven't seen before, mounted directly to the flywheel and behind the screen and fan: [img]/club2/attach/clyde/2110h.jpg[/img] It's a little hard to see in this picture, but it's two pieces - one flat piece of sheet metal and the other a 'lip' that comes out thru the hole in the rear cover. I haven't found this in any of the diagrams yet. As you can see one of the tabs is rusted off. I couldn't see any real use for this other than perhaps it helps with airflow? I left it off for now, so 1st question - will I 'hurt' anything without this? 2nd question - the engine had previously been converted to a coil. As I was putting the engine back in I noticed that the wire from the switch goes to the coil '-' terminal and the coil '+' terminal is wired to the points. I thought (there I go thinking again:D) a coil wouldn't work wired backwards, but I left it and the engine fired right up. I had to know - so I switched the wires to the 'right' way, and it also worked fine. (The coil is a Delco Remey). I'm confused! TIA, Clyde
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Clyde, My 243431 doesn't have anything like that on the flywheel. My S-G pulley has vanes cast into it like a fan. Never had any cooling problems with that one. A coil should work either way. It is a transformer, so it doesn't matter which way the current flows. I think the polarity is marked primarily because there can be several wires hooked to a coil, and that gives a way to specify which terminal each wire goes on.
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Clyde, The extra sheetmetal is for improved air flow and to lessen the size of foreign objects sucked into the cooling system. I don't remember what goes wrong with the coil wired backwards but there is a good reason to have it wired correctly. Maybe someone else can remember what happens. My thoughts,
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If a coil is wired backwards there is some loss of spark. I remember reading a Popular Mechanics story in the 60's and the case was solved because the car would not reach top speed due to a reversed polarity to the coil. Think of the coil as really two coils with a common ground. If you don't use the common ground, there will be some loss of high voltage. Not enough to worry about but still a bit.

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