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dav

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This sickle bar project is testing my discouragement limit to the max! Got the bar from Washington state thru another club. Was in no rush, had the extra money, and had no practical reason to own a sickle bar. I already knew that the bar the teeth rivet to was broken. Someone in this club gave me a name to contact to get a bar made. I ordered the bar-actually I ordered two of them- and waited. Turned out fedex delivered them somewhere else. A second set was made and delivered. Excellent workmanship on the bars. Thanks, Howard. Noone locally has rivets that are even close but a fastener supplier that my work uses for rock crusher parts got some for me. I needed 3 rock guards. I went to the Dublin, NH show hoping to find rivets. There was a rusty sickle for a David Bradley that looked like it used the same teeth and guards. For $3 I figured I could try my luck. Yahoo! They ARE the same. (that makes up for not getting the B10 w/ hi-lo cause I got there late and the lady guarding it made it plain that it was for her and not for sale!!) Now working on the drive unit. The drive pulley is bent and the bearing behind it is junk. And the belt guard is bent also. By the time I get this durn thing running, it will be time to put the snowblower back on! And I still don't have a practical reason to own it.
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The bar on mine has one tooth that is loose. Are they special rivits? I was just going to use hard alluminum rivits we use at work for the sides of tailers. Elon
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Elon, They are steel rivets. They are a little smaller than 1/4 inch. Don't know the actual size cause I don't have an extra one to measure. I recently rivited all of the teeth to a new bar from Howard. Did it by hand with only a ball peen hammer. Man that took some time.
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What about the blades? Has anyone come up with an alternate source for them? I have about half the amount of NOS blades needed to replace the old rusted blades on mine. Been putting off the restoration on it till I had a full set.I belive it takes 23. Mack
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Sandy Lake can provide the knives/blades. They're been able to find a source for them, and typically stock them, per Bill at the recent GOTO. I think they sell them for $5 each.
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I did find rivets of the correct diameter, just a little longer than the originals. I bought a rivet tool for my impact hammer from Avery Tools via the internet. They sell specialty tools for the home built aircraft people. It worked great, the extra length was not a problem. GregB
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Sandy Lake has the knife sections and rivets.Brenda says they have 1/2 inch and 3/4 inch rivets.Not sure wich ones I need for a MFG#210 sickle mower.Although 3/4 inch seems a bit long,I would hate to order some and find out they are to short.Anyone know for sure the lenth needed? Mack
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quote:
Originally posted by Mack
Sandy Lake has the knife sections and rivets.Brenda says they have 1/2 inch and 3/4 inch rivets.Not sure wich ones I need for a MFG#210 sickle mower.Although 3/4 inch seems a bit long,I would hate to order some and find out they are to short.Anyone know for sure the lenth needed? Mack
The correct rivets are 3/16" x 1/2" steel.
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Thanks Dutch, I see that three of the knife sections will need holes in them for where the cutter bar bolts up to the linkage.I'll have to ask Brenda about that or drill them. Mack
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Some on told me you should install the steel rivits hot, and smush them hot as well. Any one ever try of hear of it? Seams it would be easyer. Elon
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Hot riveting is the way to go. That's how it was done years ago when putting up a building. Insert it red hot, peen it over good and tight, then as the rivet cools and shrinks, it will tighten even more.
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  • 1 month later...
Well,I finally have enough knives to start on the sickle mower. I need to have three sections with the bolt holes for the sickle head.I had one with the hole already in it so gave three more to a friend to take to his shop and grind the holes needed.He brought them back today and said that he just used a regular drill on them.Seems thay are only hardened on the edges? Anyway I now have an extra just in case.

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Hi, When I was young and we used sickle mowwers for hay and on binders, we removed them by putting the sickle in an old iron leg vise and the jaws were just snug. The sickle bar was resting on the back jaw and my dad just took a heavy hammer and hit the back of the section driving it down shearing the rivets. Then he had a tool like a block of steel with a raised part with a hole in it. He would put the rivet head over the hole and with a punch out the remaining rivet part. We would put the new section in and the rivet through it. Next he would cut the rivet off with a fencing nippers about 1/8th to 3/16 of an inch above the section. Using a ball peen hammer he would rivet the sections on. He would "upset" the rivets with one blow, then had a tool like a punch with a hole in it and would put the hole over the rivet and strike it and that would drive the section tight against the sickle bar. Then using the ball end of the hammer would work the rivet down by pounding around the edge of the rivet until it had a nice mushroom head on it. I had to help change quite a few sets of sections and it got monotonous holding the one end of the sickle. I learned a lot from him about blacksmithing and forge welding by using borax etc. My 2 cents worth and its free, value accordingly. Al Eden
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Ronald Hribar
There is a tool available that allow you to replace a section at a time while sickle is in mower. It is a simple device on one end there is a hardened pin mounted in a bolt You place the that end over the rivet you want to remove and tighten bolt until it presses rivet out of section and bar. Then on the other end there is an die that you place over new rivet and section . You tighten bolt and gives you a perfct job everytime. The sections are tight on the bar . I had on of these 30 years ago. Otherwise on a Haybine(alarge mower/conditioner) it would take forever to replace a section..
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Al is right I remenber as boy on the farm in minnesota with the horse drawn mower/ thats the way we removed the blades and riveted them back together.It was long and hard work.
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No rivets for us.^ All our equipment has bolts. They are special sickle bolts. 7/16 nut and the head end is serrated which you pound into the sickle bar. If there are rivets made for your application I'm sure the bolts are made for it also. Normally you have different lengths of bolts or rivets. Some just to hold the sections onto the bar and the longer ones to hold the sickle head to the sickle bar. If you break a section without breaking the bolts it's a very easy fix. If the bolt breaks pound it out with a punch and put another bolt in and tighten it up and go again. We used to do it the same way as al but when the bolts came into the picture we switched everything to bolts. Today it would be a painstakingly task with rivets on the 36' & 30' Macdon combine headers. Usually the sections get changed once a year on both headers before soybean harvest then they last through the following years wheat harvest. They get changed without taken the sickle out or the guards off. Pretty quick with a speed wrench. The only thing to look for if you change to bolts is make sure there is clearance under the hold downs for the nut. They are worth checking into!
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  • 4 months later...
My first entry!!! Does anyone know where I might get a 4' belly sickel mower for a 112 John Deere. I realize this is not a John Deere forum, but I don't know of any other. John Deere did not make them they are an OEM item. pjstae@yahoo.com
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Many of the JD (and Cub Cadet and other) sicklebar mowers were manufactured by Haban (now out of business). I hear you may still be able to get some parts from Sears since they also sold Haban sicklebar mowers.
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Here's one. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=50374&item=4361986966&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

Only a $900.00 reserve. ;)
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andy gartner
We had so much snow last night in the blizzard that's heading East...our buddy, Paul Bunyon used the sickle bar to cut the snow down to snowblower height.
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I had the holes drilled at a machine shop and they drilled fine. I told the guy that they were hardened, but he tried the drill and it worked. JH PS where is the information for the guy that makes up the bars? Thanks for any help. JH
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john, I tried to open up the rivet holes on mine to standard size and it ate three drill bits. I couldn't drill them
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