Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

  • Announcements

    • Kent

      Sign In or Password Problems?   10/09/2016

      If you can't Sign In, you need to reset your password.  Use the Forgot Your Password link at the bottom of the Sign In screen, and the site will send you an email to reset it. If you have an AOL email account, use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the screen -- AOL is intermittently blocking email from the site.
    • Kent

      Feedback Please!   10/28/2017

      See News and Announcements forum.
Sign in to follow this  
Yellowbee

3410 - Can't get plugs out?!

Recommended Posts

Good_Ole_JR
Once you do get the plugs out, replace them and be sure just to snug them up real well. You don't have to tighten them so tight as if it was holding the entire tractor together.....lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Tim - any socket that works is worth the price. Snap-On had the "flank drive" patent and then I remember there was a dispute when Sears/Craftsman got it. Do you know if they are still using it? These special sockets also work well on rounded blade bolts - sometimes you need to use a metric size if it's really been chewed - just pound it on if you can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yellowbee
Acquired a 3410 last year, fixed the immediate problems and started using it. Now that I see what a wonderful workhorse it is, I'd LIKE to take CARE of it! BUT... 1) Can't get the plug out to check lube level in bevel gearbox. 2) Can't get the plug out in transmission gearbox either. It no longer has an elbow as shown in my manual--just a plug in the side of the case. But BOY, did someone overtighten!! 3) Can't even get the drain plug out of the 10HP Briggs! (I HAVE been checking the oil level at least.) Plugs are 7/16" square. Simple open end wrench has too much give for the force involved (esp. since somebody swiped my good Craftsman open end), no American socket fits the plug exactly, and 13mm metric also rounds corners. I'm reduced to vice grips, unless somebody has a better idea. Of course, I left penetrants on them. I havn't tried hot yet, or tried applying heat. Any other suggestions? Any bright ideas I havn't thought of? Thanks, Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
grandpawrichard
try spraying a little Diesel oil on the threads, diesel will penetrate where nothing else will! Antifreeze will also penetrate and lubricate siezed in threads. By all means, don't apply heat as you will ruin some seals! A friend of mine found out the hard way! Also do yourself a favor and get a good set of tools, they are like money in the bank! Never use vice grips, the do more damage than good; same with Cresent wrenches! Just my two cents worth! Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JoeJ
Brian, If you use heat be very carefull,,It will travel, and can burn seals, also be carefull of what the surrounding material is!! Try when hot, just after mowing, That may do it. And I think we would be better off without vicegrips!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! They ruin as much as they save!! Joe J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BenB
Brian I just put a Craftsman 7/16" eight point socket on my plugs and it seems to fit well. If there is any displaced metal from rounded corners try removing that with a file first. If the plugs are too far gone and need to be replaced, then you may wish to try a good quality pipe wrench(if there is room.) One more suggestion and only as a last resort may be tig-welding a short hex head bolt to the plug and using a standard socket. Only ones I can think of at the moment,But I'm sure some of the other guys have some ideas that will save the day. Let us know how it turns out Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BenB
By all means get the proper 8 point socket and use a long ratchet or breaker bar (at least 12"-18") to get enough leverage before you "round out" the plugs. Otherwise you REALLY will have a mess. They are available at Sears or automotive stores that also supply tools. Snap-On sockets work very well as they grab the "flats" and not the corners that tend to get rounded. There is also a new "swirl" design that works very well but I don't know if it's available in 8 point yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BenB
Brian, as a certified mstr mech I would like to rec. finding a Snap-On tool dealer.(just ask your local repair facility when their dealer comes around) He will have a premium socket that will fit and they have a patent on their sockets that prevents rounding. It costs more ,but in yor case it sounds cheaper than replacing all your seals when the case gets over-heated.Be careful and good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tej
I agree with the above. 8 point sockets are the thing to use on square plugs or nuts. I have a set from craftsman and use them often. My opinion is that snap-on cost too much and I would never buy them. Craftsman and Huskey will get the job done just as well, again my opinion. Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Thanks for all the suggestions. As of now, I'm 2 for 3. Amazing what good advice and the right tool will do...stopped by Sears at lunch and spent $2.99 on an 8 point socket. Much to my embarassment, I forgot (if I ever knew) that 8 point sockets existed. (In my defense, I make my living as a CPA - and a fairly rare one that's willing to get greasy playing with my toys....) (An aside...it's ironic but true how MUCH respect we have for Craftsman hand tools (usually 2nd on most folks list after Snap-On), and how LITTLE we have for Craftsman lawn tractors (what I call sheet metal dime store tractors...and I had one till last year!) Both gearbox plugs came right out with the 8 pt socket, after I filed the rough edges and tapped socket on lightly with a ball peen hammer. (Yes, it fit that tight.) Unfortunately, the engine drain plug was too far gone. It rounded off completely with the same socket. I might take advantage of a certain club sponsor - I'm 3 miles from Jack's Simplicity - and have him change the oil once :-) Somehow, I suspect he'd have a trick or two I don't. I will try one more time myself when it's THOROUGHLY hot, then set up to have it done. I'm very concerned that both gearboxes were quite low. Hope I didn't do too much damage..... Thanks again for all the help!! Brian L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BradW
Take a handy socket wrench and socket and attach it to the plug, Then take a piece of pipe and attach it to the socket wrench try turning the pipe if you still can't get it to turn hit the pipe with a hammer.It gives you the leverage you need to take the plug out. I did this when dismantiling my B-10 and had great luck with it. -BradW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tej
Jeff, I think just about every tool maker has their own version of the sockets and wrenches that grip the sides rather than the corners. I think WalMart even has them in their Popular Mechanics brand. With a square nut the eight point socket grips more area than a 12 point on a hex nut so if the square plug is not already damaged the 8 point socket should work fine. You do need good quality tools. Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al
All right Brian! 2 out of 3 is a lot better than 0 out of 3! You could get out the 1/2" drill and open er up - right through the bottom of the frame! Any way to file it down to the next smaller size and try another 8 pt? Or can you drill it out and try an easy out? If you can hollow it out it may give some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×