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BrownA

loader tractor with chains

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BrownA
One week ago we got a couple inches of snow up here in Massachusetts. I drove my B110 with loader into my back yard to fool around and pile some snow for the kids. Big mistake. The machine was absolutely useless in the snow. Now, I do have wheel weights, a rear weight box with weight and of course my 200 lbs. All the tires did was spin and spin. My question is I have heard mixed feelings on puting chains on a machine with a loader. I think I am going to put a set on because it was so useless last week that I might as well just park it untill spring. Any problems that could arise because of adding chains, is this a bad move ? I think it's the right thing to do. I am just curious if there is anything I should know before I do it ?

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D-17_Dave
The loader puts a lot of stress on the tractors when moveing dirt and very heavy stuff that has a lot of resistance. The chains provide a good level of traction but will beat you and the tractor to death on dry hard ground. However in the winter with soft snow I think most of that would be absorbed into the snow and still provide a good measure of traction. Remember the loader on the front end puts a lot of wieght on the dead steering axle. It takes a lot of traction to overcome this weight. I think the added weight on the rear will help as much as anything. The wheel loses traction and spins and thats the week point in the system so you don't tear up anything. Add weight till you can work it but still spin if you load it heavy or if you might hit something solid under the snow.

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EricD
Al, you already know my experience but I think I could have been more cautious and avioded damaging my machine. My thoughts are that too much traction is a killer of tractor parts under load/stress. I snapped a tooth in a transmission (non-Simplicity machine) because the chained wheels didn't spin and the belt didn't slip under load. I'm pretty sure Kent had experience with damage when his loader tires were spinning and then caught traction under load too. However, if you are going to be able to use your tractor at all for the winter snow piling out back, I'd say adding more weight (fill that near empty box to the rim) and changing to good rear lug tires would be my first choice prior to using chains. If the lugs don't do it, then chains it must be. BTW, I'd leave the lug tires on and chain them.

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Hughey
I have a 3112V with wheel weights, fluid filled tires and chains.I also have a weight box for the back and don't use it because it sticks out to far to suit me.Never had any problems breaking things,but I dont run full throttle or run hard into things I belive the key to this is to respect the power these small tractors really do have. And if I do start spinning I usually use the bucket all the way dumped then lower it and use the Hyds. to give me a little push back.Then go back in at a different angle.

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