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roma3112

SNOWBLOWER REMOTE CHUTE ANGLE ADJUSTMENT

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roma3112
guys Have any of you set up your older snow blower attachments to allow the chute deflector to be operated either by an electric motor or a cable-type set up? I have the chute set up to rotate electrically but would like to have the ability to angle the chute because my driveway kinda dictates that i change the angle frequently as not to misplace snow in the neighbors yards. I am seriously contemplating asking santa for a snow cab and this ability would help greatly as i would use the feature literally 10-20 times throughtout the cource of doing my driveway. Any suggestions pics of completed projects would be appreciated. thanks

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roma3112
maynard thanks would you happen to have the MFG# for that blower? i think i will look up the cost of the individual parts and price it out. Any idea how i can find out how long the adjustment cable is? i would need to figure out if the legnth will be enough. thanks for the info

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dratkinson
You can get a 6' twist-lock cable from Checker Auto for about $25-$35 (don't remember). Used one to put this feature on my track-drive Craftsman snowblower. Works good. I've also been thinking I'd like to add this feature to Baby Alice's snowthrower. However, I have been noticing that all of the snow-throwing pictures I've seen on here don't seem to have this feature---it seemed this was not an important feature. ...but now that I'm thinking about it again... /r David

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roma3112
in my case i would use the feature because some areas o fthe driveway border houses and parking areas and if i had the chute all the way up i would be taking out storm windows and pelting cars with snow :D so i have to constantly adjust the chute in those areas. we dont have any checker auto in this area but there is a napa and autozone, i will give them a try. I just have to think up a way to mount the attaching points to actually control the chute. How did you acomplish this on your craftsman? With that twistlock cable you used is the inner cable exposed to the elements or does it have some sort of sheild?

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dratkinson
John, You might also check for a Carquest autoparts store. I was mistaken when I was remembering AutoZone. The cable is make by Motormite (www.motormite.com). 8' twist-lock cable, part# 55209, $27+ http://motormitedormancatalog.com/item.wws?qty=1&mfr=MOTORMITE&sku=55209&price=&cookieID=1DW19LZPQ1DW19LZPP 15' twist-lock cable, part# 55201, $32+ http://www.motormitedormancatalog.com/item.wws?qty=1&mfr=MOTORMITE&sku=55201&price=&cookieID=1DW19WG111DW19WG10 My handle portion is mounted through the snowblower panel that is mounted between the handles. I drilled a 1" hole through the panel and attached a metal bracket under the panel. The cable runs through and is bolted to the bracket under the panel, but sticks up above the panel. I covered the cable with clear vinyl tubing from the hardware store. This keeps the snow and water out of the cable. If you lube the cable with anything, make sure it does not turn to slush when it gets cold. I cut my cable to length so that it is long enough to follow the chute as it rotates, but is not so long as to be getting in the way of other stuff. When you cut the cable, remember to leave the core about 6" longer then the sheath. Below the chute deflector, I mounted a carriage bolt (from inside to outside) to the fixed portion of the chute and bolted it tight. The bolt sticks out about 2". To this bolt, I bolted a small cable clamp. The cable clamp goes over the cable and holds the sheath in position and prevents the sheath from moving. When I cut the cable, I did so such that I had about 4-6" of the core sticking out. To this core I attached a wire stop (from Ace hardware). To the moveable portion of the chute, I bolted 2 small strips of 1/8" steel. The strips are separated by 2 washers and are about 3/16" apart. At the end of each strip is a hole large enough to accept the wire stop. The core portion of the cable runs between the metal strips, the wire stop fits in the holes in the metal strips, and the wire stop is screwed to the cable core. I attached the metal strips to the moveable portion of the chute deflector so that the wire stop holes were about 3" from the deflector hinge. The cable control has about 3"-4" of movement and the metal strip mounting holes position the cable core so I can move the chute from full up to full down. But, I hardly every use the full down position. For weather protection, the end of the cable core is covered by a piece of wire loom (the split accordian-looking wire covering used on wiring harneses). I used a piece about 4" long. I stuck a wooden dowel into the top end of the wire loom and clamped it solid with a worm-screw hoseclamp. A hole drilled in the wood allows the cable core to pass through the wooden plug. A screw through the side of the wire loom, goes through the wooden dowel and clamps onto the cable core. This keeps the cover in place. This cover is pushed up next to the metal strip brackets. The carriage bolt, hose clamp bracket is attached about 6" below the wire loom cover. This allows the cable core to move the deflector full up to full down, with the wire loom covering protecting the cable core, but not hitting the carriage bolt / hose clamp bracket when it is in the full down position. Hope this helps. If I had a camera I could save a 1000 words, and it would probably be clearer. /r David

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roma3112
david thanks for the help! I was able to find the cable in napa yesterday, i went to lowes and bought all kinds of misc hardware in order to fabricate the chute end of the blower. I had no great ideas on how to do it until i read your post. Thanks for taking the time, i will print out what you posted and hopefully i will have time at work today to doodle a bit and get a sketch drawn up. There is some work i can do but the tractor is still at the shop undergoing a motor swap, so I wont have it for another week or two, but i will do what i can without it here . take care john

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dratkinson
John, I forgot the spring. Between the chute and deflector, on the back side, I attached a spring that that is under tension and pulls the deflector open. This helps the cable as cables work better under tension than compression. The bracket on the deflector is made from a piece of angle iron. Bolt the angle to the deflector (carriage bolts from inside the deflector). Put a hole in the upright portion of the angle. A second piece of angle is bolted to the rotating ring at the base of the chute; use an existing bolt on the rotating ring. The spring I use is too short to cover the distance between the angle iron holes; so I take up the difference with a heavy piece of copper wire. By adjusting the length of the copper wire, I can adjust the tension on the spring. When I use the snowblower, if I have trouble opening the deflector, I shorten the copper wire and increase the tension until it works right. Go back and look at UCD's diagram. The spring on the diagram is used to force the deflector open...so the control cable is working under tension, and not compression. Notice that the spring itself is working under compression, and not tension. This is why there is a rod through the spring; so it will not deform to the side when it is placed under tension. Good luck. Pictures when you finish. /r David

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