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MPH

Spark Plug Lifespan

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MPH
Wondering if any of you who have converted your tractor to electronic Ign have noticed an increase in spark plug life. While the van is in the shop I decided to check the ones in there, which been in since I replaced the heads 45,000 miles ago. I can't believe how fine they look, still gapped at .044 like specked, barley a brown tint in color. 160lbs compression +/- maybe 4 lbs, not bad for 328,000 miles. Might make half a million yet. I've noticed the same thing on my pick-up, after about 50,000 I replace them just because I feel guilty. Guess I spent too many years doing a tune up every 5,000 miles.

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stevenj
With electronic ignition, fuel injection, and unleaded fuels, the spark plug life in vehicles is much greater. I've known people who have gone over 100,000 miles without changing the plugs and no noticeable performance change. The problem is that the threads have a tendence to sieze and rust in place so when you do go to change them you can't get them out. I would recommend that if you don't regularly change or inspect them that once a year or every other year you put a socket on them and loosen them a couple of turns and then tighten them back up to keep them from siezing up.

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UCD
I have seen plugs seize in a couple thousand miles. This is due to dissimilar metals between the plugs and aluminum heads. The best solution to this problem is a little never seize on the threads before installing.

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D-17_Dave
I absolutely agree with Maynard. A little never seize works wonders on plugs. As for the life of the plug, new materials have alowed plugs to last longer but I don't see 100'000 miles. Athough something else does usually go bad before then.lol

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D-17_Dave
quote:
Originally posted by Roy
The newer cars with platinum plugs are designed to go 100,000 miles before their first tuneup.
I don't know about that. I run Bosch platnims in all my vehicles and I'm very pleased. Both in the performance and the durrabiltty of them. I beleave in the plat. plugs. I do however have a hard time beleaveing the so called recomended replacement time for 100,000 mile tuneup. They can say whatever they want to about scheduled mantinance but I'd never leave a set of plugs in that long. I know the plug wires would never servive near that long.

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stevenj
quote:
Originally posted by D-17_Dave I do however have a hard time beleaveing the so called recomended replacement time for 100,000 mile tuneup. They can say whatever they want to about scheduled mantinance but I'd never leave a set of plugs in that long. I know the plug wires would never servive near that long.
I have to disagree on the durability of plug wires. We've run a 1987 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer 4wd for 150,000 miles on the original plug wires and a 1989 GMC S-10 Jimmy 4wd for 245,000 miles on the original plug wires. Both vehicles ran great when they were sold. As long as you keep them off the exhaust manifold and don't allow them to get soaked with oil they will hold up.

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D-17_Dave
I had the opposite effect. My 84 S-10 with Beldon wires would burn out about every 60,000 or so. I had the same in our van. I think the heat under the engine compartment has a lot to do with this. I've added considerable ventalation and cooling capacity to my full size pu and haven't seen near the problems. I still think what the auto makers recomend in their advertiseing streches the truth or reality to the limit. I guese thats the point I was trying to make.

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richp
My wifes Dodge avenger you have to take the intake off to get to the back 3, so I am in no rush to change them. My neighbor had same problem with his van and just left them in for 160,000 miles. Van ran great when he traded it in. When I used to drag race, I would take plugs out 3 times a day (cold plug for nitrous or hot for without) and a little never seize would go a long way on those $9000 aluminum heads.

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10HorseMan
Changed the plugs in my grandpa's 95' Ranger, and they were bad looking after 130 +/- grand. Changed the wires which were in really good shape. Turned out to be the coil but the truck has 203,000 on it and a new engine at 60+/-thousand. Guess it's ready for another hundred thousand.

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country
My 98 Ford F150 has 105,000 with original plugs and wires. I too feel guilty about not changing them. But, my brother is a mechanic, and recommends if not problems, don't change them, there's nothing wrong.

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