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10HorseMan

How do you get the paint off, UPDATE

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10HorseMan
I have rewritten this topic. Yesterday I delivered the tractor to a sandblasting shop. Today I started removing the starter/generator, sanded it, and painted it, and the engine. Also the previous owner had the seat recovered with the wrong stuff and left the original. So this means the new seat. Should get the tractor back Wednesday and prime and paint. As for the painting I done today, it looks really good.

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MDB
Justin, The easiest way to get the old paint and rust off is to have the tractor sandblasted. You can also use paint stripper, or scrape wirebrush and sand it off. When I did my B-110 I used the scrape wirebrush and sand method.....I used acrilic enamel paint with hardener to get a nice finish. The Wells decal are a good choice, a little pricey but worth it in the end.

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RobS
As far as the decals I too purchased from Wells and agree with MDB, they sure were nice quality and nice too install. The paint removal and painting is a whole different ballgame - it's all up to you as far as your capabilities & tools/equipment, what you want to spend, what you want to do yourself, how much time you have, how picky you are with the results, I mean the list of choices is practically endless - Some people want trailer queens and some just want good lookin' clean worker tractors, It's totally up to you I don't know how else to explain it in my opinion. But one thing for sure, regardless of the paint quality or application, it's the prep that plays a major role in the final product so don't skimp there if you really want that show look. I used my pnuematic mini angle die grinder with different abrasive and surface conditioning discs to remove most of the paint on my B210 to bare metal but the sandblasting can get into the harder to reach places, but then again you probably can't see those areas that much anyway, see here I go again....

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WarrenVineyards
If you are going to put on new decals, and you want them to look good, you'll need to use a sandable filler if there is any pitting in the metal underneath the decals.

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ehertzfeld
Now don't laugh, I use my tourch to get the old paint off. After I burn off the paint, I use sand paper/wire brush to clean it up. I admit it's not as good as sand blasting but it's pritty quick and it does a good job. Elon

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HubbardRA
Elon, I also have used a torch to remove paint. The wheels on my 713S were becoming a real bear to get the paint off of. I grabbed the torch, flashed the paint, scraped it off with dull knife, sanded and painted. Paint don't like that high heat. After all, they also use heat tools to remove paint from door facings and trim, when they are repainting a house.

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Agricola
The torch is a great way to remove paint, especially if you kick up the oxygen... BUT.. I am of the belief that paint sticks better to paint than to metal. Hence, if you have a good layer of paint, smooth it out with a sanding disc, fill in the holes and low spots, prime if you desire and then repaint. Just my humble opinion.

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D-17_Dave
If going to bare metal is what you want, I had good luck with an orbtal sander. If you want to take it all off, use it on spin. If you want to just scuff it to repaint, then use it on orbital. I used a 360 grit to get the paint on off then orbit to polish the metal. This left it rough enough for the paint to stick to the metal good. I just finished takeing almost all the paint off my pu this way and I was very pleased with the results. Now if i could just have time I'd paint it.lol

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TomMaryland
My first choice would be sandblasting, but since I don't have access to one for the body panels I've been using a scotchbrite paint removal wheel in a drill. It seems to take the original paint off right to bare metal fairly well. Then I prime with etching primer, scuff it up a tad with an orbital and paint with acrylic enamel/hardener through a gun. A little scuff between coats and a tacky wipe down and it comes out looking like it was from the showroom floor. If you want to go the extra 9 yards a clearcoat on top will make it really sparkle.

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WarrenVineyards
quote:
I am of the belief that paint sticks better to paint than to metal.
Agricola is right. If the original paint is bonded well, then don't go to metal. Preping metal is a pain, plus you're not likely to have 'environmental' conditions as good as they had at the factory. If rust is minimal and the paint damage is only on the surface, then you'll be making more work for yourself by going to the metal.

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10HorseMan
The last tractor I done I used a wire brush and it took a long time. I have a feeling that the original coat is bonded good, and that it will look right if i painted over it, but the question is that someone painted over it with A-C orange and it is coming off slowly but surely. I just want a good looking work tractor, and if i get it down to the bare coat and rough it up with a wire brush on drill, and prime then paint. How many coats did you all put with the hardner in it, and how much to thin it out to get the good look. Also my area of question is what color to paint the engine, rear end, and the top section of grill ''Where the A-C emblem is''

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Simplicity314
I've also used fire to remove paint--with much aprehension--on my Fiat. Works well. Also, all paint should be removed. You don't know if there is oxidation festering under what looks like a good strong coat. All it takes is a pinhole to allow in moisture and air. You know that blistering you see around car wheel wells? That's rot that started from the underside. Don't trust 40-year-old paint. You can have rot from the inside out. Strip it down, fine sand it to remove all pitting and just be sure to use an ETCHING PRIMER ( a GOOD chemical reaction)and keep everything clean. It'll stick just fine.

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deerhunter
From my days of working in my uncle's body shop, I've found that the paint remover/stripper works great if you want to go to bear metal. You can get it at any automotive parts store. When we weren't going to bear metal, we used the DA. Considering that I have family members that own a body shop, you'd think my AC's would look like new, but that's not the case. To many tractors, to little time!!!

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Allis_B12
I used an angle grinder with a wire cup brush. Went down to bare metal on all sheetmetal. Whatever you do, wear appropriate protection. I wouldn't doubt that there's at least one coat of lead paint on the tractor. I didn't use a respirator or mask, and, looking back, it's the one thing I would've changed.

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Chris727
Justin, the engine and drivetrain should be the easiest to come up with a paint to match because most black paint looks the same. A semi-gloss would look best. On the engine use a high heat paint. I used duplicolor high heat engine paint on a 16HP briggs, looks good but a little bit more gloss than I wanted.

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dlcentral
I've done all different ways, the easiest prob is the propane torch//heat gun razor scraper way, it comes off in sheets once paint is heated and softened.Be careful not to over haet the metal though,as that might warp it.Also best to be done outdoors.Then a light sanding,surface cleaning with thinner and you are ready for prime[I prefer grey] and paint.Tractor Supply sells a very good quality tractor emamel for 7.99 a qt 3.99 a spray bomb,,.

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10HorseMan
quote:
Originally posted by comet66
When ever you use a powered wire brush. Do not forget to wear safety glasses, as those bristles do come out on the fly, and can cause serious injury.
Thanks Comet, I did remember this, but when I was working on the air cleaner the brush caught hold and went to work on my hand,:(![:0]:(

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HubbardRA
Justin, When you apply decals to the finished paint job, be sure to spray the adhesive side of the decal and the surface it will be applied to with Windex. This will give you several minutes to move the decal and to get it lined up and work the bubbles out before the decal starts to stick tightly to the surface.

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10HorseMan
quote:
Originally posted by Chris727
Did you dissassemble the whole tractor? It'd be nice to see some pics when the tractor is finished.
Not quite yet, but when I get it back I will probablly go ahead and finish taking it apart, the reason I didn't is that the sandblaster may want to move it and it may be hard with no wheels. As for the pics I will try to get the ol digital up and going and read up on them in ''Help and FAQs'' I received the decals from Wells yesterday, and they are really nice.

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