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AC808

What kind of primer to use before paint?

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AC808
Ive seen lots of posts about paint but havent seen one about primer. Have any of you had good luck with the cheaper rattle cans used under better paint? Or should i invest in better primer (if there is such a thing)? Im planning on using automotive quality paint on my B10 and i DONT want it to come off any time soon. Opinions??

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BLT
Jay before you get into primming, attention has to be spent on metal preperation, I think. There are more out then me that will tell you which way to go. If the surface is not good, a bad paint job is sure to follow.

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bud119195
I always use a laquer based primer. First sand everyting real good and give it a coat of sanding primer, then lightly hit it with 400 grit paper ,then top it off with regular primer.DUPLICOLOR and PLASTICOAT are real good products

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BigSix
Not to hijack your thread, but a related question: I was reading in one of Hemming's Motor's new, (excellent!) magazines ("Collector Car" or something like that?) about using "weld through primer." Anybody know what that is, and what its advantages might be? Also, is it much more expensive than regular automotive primer? Thanks.

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Bergy
Self Oxidizing Primers are excellent for these applications. We used metal etching materials, such as alodyne, to protect that which would not be painted. Usually this was on steel parts that were not galvanized or stainless, typically hardware. On surfaces exposed to the elements and the environment in genreral, we always primed with a self oxidizing primer which creates not only a durable layer, a thicker coat to reduce imperfections, but set up the steel to be protected by providing a system in which when the paint was compromised to the metal, it would stop the rust from sprawling by oxidizing that particular area. Not only this, but no matter how clean you get something on steel, it rusts before your eyes. Start by removing as much rust as possible, to get to the good metal below, then going over the areas with a good professional grade wax and oil remover (available from any good paint store (be sure not to touch the metal with bare hands as the oil in your hands can screw things up) and then shooting two to five coats of primer, depending on the exposure site, typically anything that goes over the ground (mower) or under the ground (tines, etc.) followed by a light (400 grit wet sand) to the areas you want to look really good (hood, seat pan, side panels) followed by one more coat of primer and the 3-5 coats of a good laquer or enamal based paint with hardeners and then clear coating for scractch resistance. Remember, the more you spend the loner it will last. Body shops et cetera are designed to do a good job at a reasonalble price. In aircraft, like military as I used to work on, money was no object and this is the way they did things. You still see Hueys flying around and they are ancient yet still in remarkalby great shape. Hope this may have helped, I am sure there are some serious professionals here who can fill in any gaps.

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AGCO918
I in the past always Sandblast the metal,sand with a low grit paper ,blow off the metal with air ,clean off with paint thinner to get the dirt & dust off the metal and then use a auto type primer.The red oxi,or the gray is what i have used.I then put on a few thin coats of primer,sanding between each coat.You can put a sealer on,like the pros do.Then you should do the same on the painting.Put a couple thin coats on ,sand with a low grit paper to get the paint to stick.Then shoot a couple more coats.If you have a friend at a body shop see if they can put it in a booth and let it bake on like they do on cars.Then you can wetsand with a real low grit paper,and clearcoat it like they do on show cars.I have never used a sealer or clearcoat,but if i was going to do a tractor to last forever,i would spend the money &time doing it in that order.The more money you spend on better paint,it will last longer,but as stated you have to prep the metal or the paint will not stick.I always sand after sandblasting just to get the metal smooth& clean off the dirt as i said with paint thinner.Hope this helps you on your ?s .I am no pro by no means but have sandblasted enough to know what to do to prep it for painting. Agco9118

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Tom Deutsch
Cheap paint on top of good preparation will always look better and last longer than the best paint on top of skimpy prep. That's true for metal, wood, walls, whatever. Compatibility between the primer and the paint is also a big issue, IMO.

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Tom45
The one I am working on has some rust. I am sandblasting, applying epoxy primer, and topcoating. If I wanted a show quality job, I would add a surfacer and sanding before the topcoat. It can avoid problems to use the same brand of paint throughout. The paint supplier should have their recommendations. The epoxy primer I use (PPG) requires topcoating within 7 days or it must be sanded and reprimed with more epoxy primer.

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