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rokon2813

My personal loader debate

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rokon2813
Last year, I built "toys" for the kids. This year, they arent pulling, so I get the "toys" this year. My personal debate has been which tractor to build the loader for. Another part of it, is the merits of dual wheels. I want the traction of duals, but I don't want the wheels wider than the loader bucket. I also like things that are "not so popular" so to speak. So I've decided on the Homelite. I cant remember seeing a loader mounted on a Homie yet.

This Homelite was one of my experiments. So, just being a Homelite with a loader makes it "not so popular", and do you think this will solve my "duals" dilemma? 12" of tire, inside the width of the bucket. Total width is 40" :D

"Narrowing" the rear was the experiment with this one. Whatta ya think ???

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comet66
Loaded 12" tires add much to the stability of a loader tractor. [img]/club2/attach/comet66/hitch%284%29.JPG[/img] I needed extra wheel weights to counter the loads I put in the bucket.

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Kent
My 2 cents, based on using the Simplicity loader: 1. The most important thing is a VERY strong subframe. If you're not concerned with being able to have a mid-mount implement on it (which the original ones could have) then I'd recommend "over-engineering" the subframe so that youu don't have to concern yourself with the BGB-front frame's butt joint... a known weak spot. Make the sucker strong, and very rigid... a little more weight down low won't hurt anything anyway. 2. If you have a good shuttle tranny, you may want to consider using it, since you'll be doing a lot of forward >> reverse shifting. This would allow multiple speed ranges for using the tractor with loader. The original shifter makes it easy to go from 2nd to reverse, but constantly shifting from 1st or 3rd to reverse is a pain. If you use a 3-speed, I'd recommend either a 9" or 10" speed reduction pulley on the tranny. The 10" was a bit slow, with my 23X8.50X12 tires, but with those monsters that you have there, I think it would probably work OK. 3. Don't go over a 42" bucket. Like you mention, just enough bucket to clear your treadwidth... 4. Put double-action lift cylinders on it, not single-action ones like the original ones used. Down-pressure makes it a lot easier to dig with... 5. Make the bucket easily detached, so you can put pallet forks on it. Pallet forks are much more useful for moving tractors and such around. While you chain things to a bucket, it can be a pain, and being able to get the weight back closer to the pivot means you can safely lift more weight...

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rokon2813
Thanks Kent !! I was hoping for some input from one of the "experts" 1)I don't care about the midmount attachments, I'm hoping to have dedicated tractors this year. 8D I have a "well engineered" front to rear plow subframe from a Ford (JoeJ built I think) that I planned on incorporating with no less than 4 attaching points on each side, so in all, 4 on the rear half, and 4 on the front half. 2)I don't have and don't like shuttle trannys, [:0]. I am going with the 3 speed. However, This tractor originally was a 6 speed, and I think I still have all the parts to put it back, if the tire clearance allows me to. Hadnt thought of that, but I might now, and if I can't, then perhaps a pulley swap is in order. (the low range half of this one is on another puller) 3)42" was the plan, as that is basically "standard" 4) double acting is the only way to go :D:D 5) I intended to have pallet forks also, just to have them, but hopefully the forklift project will work well enough that they don't see a lot of use. ;) I also intended to mount all my "extra weight" on the heavy subframe so its as low as I can get it. ;) I know that I tend to "overuse" everything, so I figured I'd "overbuild" right from the start.

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EricD
Hi Dan, Only concern I'd have is the shortened wheelbase. Even with the wide tires you may find it a bit tippy. This will be a great project but consider you may have to extend the hubs out as far as they go on the axle and perhaps, just perhaps add duals for stability. I'd go with the lowest possible first gear ground speed pulley as well. A hi/low kit would be ideal. I use low while working the hydraulics to dig and rip small trees, stumps and rocks loose. Too high a gear doesn't allow for proper tire spin or give you ample time to muscle into and through things without worry of snapping a gear.

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dads707
Dan, I was also thinking of a loader on the T-16 shuttle I have. But the reason I decided on the Homelite is BECAUSE of the shuttle drive. I figured not having to use the clutch would be one less thing to worry about. Also I have plenty of tractors I can mow, plow and such with, the hitch on the T-16 would require modification to use the implements I have.

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HubbardRA
Dan, Since you are not going to use any mid-pto attachments, why not mount your pump to run off the cone clutch. If you put it under the rear fenders, it will be easy to get at to work on/hook up. You may also want to purchase a valve with three hydraulic circuits, and put quick disconnects on the third circuit. This way you could have add-on attachments, such as a hydraulic auger, or a trencher arm with bucket, etc. When you build the frame for the vertical beams(usually box beams), also put a cross-beam underneath the tractor(made from box beam), then link the cross-beam and the vertical beams internally and use these as the hydraulic fluid reservoir. That way an additional tank is not needed. A long, horizontal tank is better for eliminating any foaming than a vertical tank. Of course you could put the fill cap up top on the vertical, so it is easy to get to, and you would have way more than enough fluid capacity. If you are going to use hoses for all hydraulic runs (no tubing), then you may want to run them inside the box beams that go between the vertical beams and the bucket (the lift beams). This way things will not be catching on the main hoses. Easy to do if you plan for it. If you have an extra front axle, you may want to cut off the wishbone, and flip the main axle putting the steering pivots forward, instead of rearward. This will give you about four more inches of wheelbase. You can then weld the wishbone back on, and lengthen the steering drag link. I was even considering dual wheels with 26x12x12 tires for those really rough areas. Normally only single wheels would be used. Also, don't forget to add a weight rack to the rear of the tractor to make it easy to hang weights on to balance a heavy bucket load, but remove them for light work. Just some of the things I was planning for mine whenever I get around to it.

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