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proteus

Stripped Threads

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proteus
Anyone have any tips for repairing stripped threads in the aluminum block? The lower carb bolt has stripped the female threads. I was thinking of drilling out the hole and inserting some kind of aluminum plug that I can tap. Maybe a parts place has a kit for this. Maybe a guy could stuff some JBWeld or PC7 in there and drill/tap new threads. What do you think?

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HubbardRA
OK, since I told you the right way above, now I will tell you the way I fixed one. I drilled the hole out and tapped to 5/16 threads. I then took a 5/16 bolt and chucked it in my lathe. Then turned it down to the size of a 1/4 bolt, preserving enough 5/16 thread on one end to screw into the block. I then threaded the turned down end to 1/4 threads. I inserted this "stud" into the block and locktited it in. I could then use a nut on the homemade stud. This was a Sunday evening fix(no place open that I could buy a helicoil set). I would still recommend a helicoil as the best method of fixing the problem.

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proteus
Thanks everyone for the tips. Does the Heli-coil solution also work on threaded holes that push all the way through. For instance, the 1/4" thick tang where the lower bolts thread into to hold the grill on. Do you just hacksaw the remaining Heli-coil spring that sticks out one end?

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HubbardRA
You should be able to use a heli-coil in that application. I'm not sure if a hacksaw will work because of the hardness of the coil. I would probably use a 4 inch grinder or a die grinder to remove the remaining coil. I would insert the coil to the required depth and then grind off the remainder of the coil that is sticking out of the hole. There are other types of thread inserts. I know one is called a "keensert". These are usually steel inserts, not coils. They require a larger hole than a helicoil. They screw in and have little stakes that you drive in to prevent the insert from turning. If the hole goes all the way thru and you have access to the back side, I usually just use a longer bolt and a locknut on the back side. Easier and cheaper.

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BrianP
As others here have said, a helicoil is the best solution to this problem. For any part that sticks out I take my trusty Dremel to it a zip, it's done. If you don't have a Dremel tool this is the perfect time to add one to your tool arsenal. Once you've used it a few times you'll wonder how you lived without it. Brian

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