Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
Jovee

Sideways Horizontal Kohler

Recommended Posts

Jovee
This could be one of those "what have I gone and done now" situations. Brought home an old Ford today with a running K-241 on it for that reason. Included in that $100 was the rest of the tractor. Out in the yard I have the AC310 and a 1250 Cub both on the recipient list (though the Allis isnt confirmed dead yet) and are both shaft drive. The Ford (Jacobsen) is sideways S/G engine with the electric PTO on the drivers side. The question... Will I be able to make this work without swapping major components? I cant see into the AC or Cub to answer what the difference may be or if something is bolted to the flywheel or molded into it? The Ford just has the screen cover over it. I didnt think ahead on this and being a B/S guy, I dont have the Kohler knowledge I need yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727
I would think of the two tractors it will be more likely to work better in the cub than the AC as it is most likely an "A" block engine with the small oil pan, at least the later shaft drive fords were that way, I guess I can't say for sure on the earliest models.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jovee
Gilson built for Ford too? I havent found the ID tag yet but would the code start off GIL like the monkeys? I was told it was the Jacobsen Ford by the owner but he could be wrong since he didnt buy it new. Does Kohler work a year into their engine codes? The styling of the tractor tells me roughly early 70s, maybe late 60s. He called it a model 100. It is a side mounted belt drive engine. Not sure about the oil pan at this point either. I'm just hoping to turn it sideways and hook a driveshaft to it if it's possible but it's sounding like there is going to be more to it. I'm not worried so much as to the s/g sticking out the side. I assumed since the Frd and Allis were both 241s it wouldnt be too complicated but thats why I'm asking. The cub is a 301. The Ford has too many issues to save it but a running engine it does have. How does an A block differ from their other blocks and how many are there? Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JoeJ
Joe, The Ford I had wasn't a S/G engine, it had the starter to flywheel. But the oil pan was welded as a cross member to the tube frame. I do believe Dan or Ambler told me an other oil pan that would go right on it though. Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rokon2813
Jake-built Fords that were shaft drive did have a different pan. It was welded in as an integral part of the frame. The model 100 if that is what you have should be belt drive with a more "normal" flat pan with bolt flanges. If that is the case, it will more likely fit the A/C rather than the cub. Cub also uses a special pan. ;) The flywheel should be predrilled to attach the flywheel adapter. Just my 2 cents for what its worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jovee
Thats the news I wanted on the flywheel -Thanks Dan. With the oil pans, with whatever differences they have, are the blocks all similar that if one pan should be different will it interchange or is the "A" block and "?" block a problem in design? Anything in the oil pickup system that could cause a problem? I should just be glad it runs but this is how I learn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
maxtorman1234
Hello, if it is a side mounted belt driven ford 100, it has the same block as the allis. the cub is diffferet, like the later fords are. the engine will drop right in the allis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al
Hi, There are 2 types of blocks. Those with ears on that have bolts that go down through the ears into the oil sump (pan) These are the engines that are used in Simplicity etc. There are the A block engines that the block has no ears and the sump bolts on with bolts from the bottom into the edge of the block. These are used in Cubs, The Ford / Jacobsons with the pipe frames, some John Deeres etc. These blocks are not interchangeable. Also one other thing to be careful of is some of the A blocks use the short dipper connecting rod, and some have a drop in the sump and use the rod with the long dipper. You MUST have the correct rod for the sump you have. These are the major issues you will need to check on. Al Eden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jovee
Thanks everyone! By the sound of it I have the new engine for the 310. I wont even attempt interchanging anything on the engine. It's the only running Kohler in the stable I would rather keep it that way. Considering what used K engines sell for I'm glad my $100 wasn't wasted. I was nervous but knowing the 310 will run again is all worth it. As long as the s/g setup is compatable in electricity as the 310 stock setup is. Anything above a self contained briggs is a new venture for me. Found the Ford to be a '67. Hate to kill an old anything but its would not be cost effective at this point. Need to figure out the mystery gear before I take it apart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    • macallis180
    • gwiseman
    • jwbegor
    • abu507
    • PGL
    • Oxfordguy
    • Jtress
  • Today's Birthdays

    1. PlayBoy
      PlayBoy
  • Recent Status Updates

    • SonOfCreepfeed

      SonOfCreepfeed

      Thinkin' about this old girl.

      · 3 replies
    • Dean McFadden

      Dean McFadden

      Good morning peeps! I’m always searching for helpful information with my AC collection. Hope to find out new information and pass on my own experience in restoration. Here are some pics of my babies. I’m still looking for front rims for the 410 so yesterday I put the 310 wheels on took it for a drive. Working pretty good but still needs some carb work. Gotta get the 310 running next. Have a great day!😁
       

      · 1 reply
  • Adverts

×