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K301 -over heating

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Recently our town dept. received a FORD tractor with a 12HP K301QAS engine from another town department. After running about 20 minutes it quits but will restart in couple of minutes after it cools. The engine is extremely hot when it quits. I pulled the plug when it was hot and there is a real good spark when cranked. The plug was dry and the top of the cyclinder looked dry. The engine is really closed in on this tractor, I think it is overheating and possibly a 'vapor lock' is being created. I plan on removing the side covers to the tractor to see if that helps the engine run cooler. Any other suggestions? Thanks...excuse the spelling of "Commisoner"....hicup.

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JCS
I would suspect you have a Ford 12 LGT. The engine does have a lot of duct work so the even the muffler gets cooled down. I would check to make sure no grass is inside the engine, the screen is where the driveshaft hooks on. Alot of equipment doesn't get good care. Also maybe the condenser is going but and when hot quits. The deck supposely is NLA so if you decide to part it out the JACOBSEN tractor site at YAHOO would find you buyers. FORD/NEW HOLLAND dealers still have some parts.

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Al
Hi, Les pull the head and the valve, wire wheel the valve stem to get all the varnish off and run a wire cleaning brush down the guide with some solvent like carb or brake cleaner in a spray can. Grind the valve and reset the clearance, put the head on and mow like hell. Good luck, Al

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-- from David A. Sohn 8/10/2000 Saint Louis Missouri david.a.sohn@juno.com Good ideas posted. Check the ignition coil for proper operation using a very wide gap on an ignition tester tool-- do not use just a spark plug laid against the engine. By forcing the spark to jump .25 or more inch, correct usage of the ignition tester tool will simulate (at standard atmospheric pressure) the load of the spark plug necessary to develop a spark at the far higher operating pressure and temperature... Also, these tips often help runnability: Be aware that many of the newer fuels are lousy for use in Air- cooled small engines. Many new fuels cause "detonation" effects-- that stresses the engine terribly and shortens its life. Several fuels burn so slowly that the fuel is still burning when it enters the muffler-- this circumstance overheats your muffler; causes reduced power; and can cause backfiring. Cheap, Low octane fuels also may encourage varnish buildup in your carburetor-- and carbon buildup on your valve stems and in combustion chamber. To get around those dilemmas try these ideas: Use the high octane fuels that pass the BMW valve- stem buildup test across 100,000 miles with virtually No valve- stem buildups. Use 93 Octane fuel; AVOID Ethanol- tainted fuel. (I use Amoco 93 Octane). Remove carbon every 100 hours. Ensure proper ignition operation and timing. Ensure your tractor gas tank, Fuel filter; and Fuel line is free of contaminants. Keep carburetor clean and properly adjusted. Store gasoline properly in airtight container. Never use old gas. Store your engine properly if to sit more than a month-- including siphoning out old gas then running engine till dies from lack of fuel in carburetor. Change Oil every 20 hours (or MORE frequent-- especially during cold weather or more dusty environments). Use 30 Wt. Pennzoil summertime; and 10W-30 Pennzoil wintertime. Ensure proper air filter maintenance. On Kohler K- Series engines, frequently clean and Oil (30 Wt) the foam prefilter around the airfilter. Ensure No Dirt is Bypassing the Air Filter. Use of Heavy Grease on the air filter lip may help prevent dirt bypass. Change the paper air filter frequently. On engines with all-foam air cleaner, frequently clean them, dry them properly-- and most important: Oil them thoroughly (3+ tablespoons 30 Wt). Work the oil through the entire filter, and wring out excess. It is the oil that "traps" the dirt going through an all-foam filter. So-- Lack of oil in the foam air filter makes the filter basically useless and lets the dirt go right on into the engine and damage it. All cooling- related components should be inspected, and cleaned annually (or more frequently under dusty conditions) using the proper service procedures. Check for and clean out clogged cooling fins; clogged fan blades on the flywheel; and ensure the blower housing and heat- carrying sheet metal is properly assembled. BTW: The breather assemblies and PCV valves are often ignored to the detriment of the engine. The breather's filter element will decay as years pass-- if integrated into a one-piece breather assembly, you must replace the entire breather assembly about every 10 years. My guess is that a PCV valve should be replaced a bit more frequently than that. Be aware that some breather assemblies have a flimsy plastic flap that goes bad also. When they get plugged with dirt, or deteriorate and function badly-- then the engine can consume large quantities of oil, due to an overly pressurized crankcase. Crankcase gaskets (e.g. "side plate" or sump gaskets) also can be blown out due to crankcase pressurization. Also, when the breather needs replacement or servicing-- then dusty air from outside the engine can be admitted into the crankcase oil. And any extra dirt in the engine oil damages the engine vigorously.

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StanS
Before doing any ripping and tearing on the engine make sure the air duct system is complete and NO air is excaping before it reaches it's intended point of exhaust. I cured the overheating in my Jacobsen 1250 (same as Ford 12) by plugging the 1" circular hole and a smaller one on the ducting over the engine's head. Duct tape covered another small opening. Stan

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