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Tom Deutsch

office boy versus tiller

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Tom Deutsch
OK, I know there has to be an easier way to do this. I tend to pick the tiller up, jam the male portion into the upper lift/receiver, yank or push until the holes line up, then lay on the ground and wrestle with the lower hitches. This is good exercise, but I’d like a better method! Should I put the lower hitches on first? Should my hydraulic lift receiver be up or down? Is it easier to mount if the tiller is sitting up on something? Taking it off is a similar operation for me but a little easier because of gravity. Any other single-tractor-implement-switching attachment jockeys out there? Or maybe this process has already been discussed – couldn’t find it when I searched. Thanks!

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UCD
I use a 38"HD tiller that weighs between 300 & 400lbs on my HB-116. I back up to the tiller with the lift down roll the tiller top hitch shaft into the tractor hitch receiver then lifting the tiller guiding the lower hitch into place (the tiller will swing side to side & front to rear easily) then installing lower hitch pins using a small bar if necessary. Usually takes longer to install the belt than to hitch to tractor.

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PhanDad
My method to mount a tiller: Lower the lift as far down as possible - that should allow the upper receiver to "float". With the tractor and tiller sitting on level ground, rotate the tiller on the tines and insert the upper male part of the hitch into the receiver. With the receiver "floating" it should be an easy install. Install the upper hitch pin. Slowly raise the lift until the tiller is just off the ground (don't have any body parts between the tiller and back of the tractor since the tiller swings that way). With the upper lift holding the tiller off the ground, swing the tiller and line up the lower hitch points and install the pins. Hook up the belt and you're ready to go.

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cwm1276
My method back up to tiller, with the lift all the way down. Connect the 2 lower pins, you should be able to slide the tiller enough to get them. Then turn the drive pulley in reverse(I think) and the tiller sitting on the ground will rotate the top and lift towards the tractor. Guide the lift into the tractor, may have to move the tractor's as it is floating.

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Tom Deutsch
I'm thinking either my lift hitch doesn't have enough slack in it or my tiller is downhill because I can never get the tiller pin to line up with the fully lowered hitch as you describe. I'll try a couple baords under the tiller next time and see if that doesn't help. The skin on my knuckles thanks you all!

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cwm1276
With the lower pins in you can lift the rear(by the lip on the newer ones) of the tiller and pivot it on the two pins. Don't know if that helps but it does avoid the knuckles. What tractor is the tiller going on? The tiller would be deeper and lift lower if you where actually tilling so I am confused that the lift won't go that low.

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Tom Deutsch
It's a puzzler, for sure. I'm sure it's something I'm doing wrong during the wrestling match, or maybe my receiver is not tilting all the way down for some reason. I'll check it out, now that I'm armed with all this patient and kind advice. It's a Deutz/Allis 917H with hydraulic lift, BTW. The tiller is a 36" Simp -- older than the tractor I think. Maybe the pin on the orange part is prejudiced against the receiver on the green part!?

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Conrad
I usually hook up the lower pins first, then roll the tiller up and insert the pin in the lift. Sometimes I think it depends on how you hold your mouth, maybe even which language you use, ie. French or Sailor. Getting unhooked sometimes causes a bigger problem. Could be that language barrier again. :)

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Brent_Baumer
My method is similar to those described. Pin it on first. Lift all the way down. Lift up on the tiller by hand and slide it in. Not really too difficult. Sounds like you have something awry.

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wilm169
I put the 2 lower pins in first then let the hitch lift down to floating and grab the back of the tiller and rotate it up inserting the lift rod and it slides right in, the easyest way I have found,this is like mounting the mower deck mount the lift arm or cable first and lift it up then the 2 front pins you do not have to fight the front weight of the deck.

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Kent
I guess I'm doing it backwards or something. I always put the top in first, lift the tiller, then put the bottom pins in... Seems to work better for me than doing it the other way, especially if the tractor and tiller aren't on level ground. Once the top is in, it's easy to move the tiller back and forth to line up everything...

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BLT
quote:
Originally posted by Kent
I guess I'm doing it backwards or something. I always put the top in first, lift the tiller, then put the bottom pins in... Seems to work better for me than doing it the other way, especially if the tractor and tiller aren't on level ground. Once the top is in, it's easy to move the tiller back and forth to line up everything...
Ditto, especially with hyd lift. Rear hitch hole is almost paralell to ground in down position. I slide large pin on lift, hold it in place with a pin, lift it as high as it will go and attach lower hitch arms, less then a ten minute job. Like I said before the job goes quicker with a greased upper pin.

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Guest
I like that HD tiller... I've got no tricks... leave my tiller on one machine all spring, summer, fall... plan to put a snow blower on that machine this winter.

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Roy
I built "creepers" to hold my tillers. Roll the tiller to the tractor. Put the lift arm in. Lift the tiller, align the holes, & put the bottom pins in. The creepers make the tillers easy to move around when they're off the tractors. Make the creeper as low as possible.

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Chris727
I always put the two lower pins in first. Then lift at the lip on the back and slide in the upper rod. I can't imagine doing it the other way. If I have the pins and idler pulley set in hand, then it only takes at most 2 or 3 minutes to hook it up and go.

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comet66
I hook up the top first, lift, and swing the bottom hitch into place as well. I have also ground a bevel on the leading end of the lower hitch pins, it helps them align themselves.

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