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MisterB

Winterizing Kit really necessary?

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MisterB
Now that I have my tractor running I finally got the blower installed and the chains on. However, I can't seem to find the metal shield that protected the carb. I believe it was part of a winterizing kit that was listed as necessary when installing the blower. My question: is this kit really necessary or can I run without it? The gentleman that sold me the blower included it, telling me that the shield kept snow and moiture from getting to the carb and freezing it up. I'm wondering if that is really a big problem. It seems to me that there must be some benefit to having this shield. Is this part still available or is there a subsitute? Tractor is a `78 7014S with 14HP briggs motor. Thanks in advance, KB

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UCD
Some engines need them some don't. I had a 7016H that saw very heavy use in winter blowing snow 4 - 5 hours every snow storm and I didn't use one and no problems. My friend only blowed about 15 - 30 min every storm and he could not run without one, constantly freezing up.

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Wishin2BMowin
The 3212H I got didn't have one. Used my blower for last Winter's 100 + inches of snow and only had troubles with the carb freezing up once. Just had to stop blowing and let it idle for a few minutes and the carb would be okay again. Like the other guys said if you blow the snow with the wind you should be okay. Best of luck...

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cwm1276
With the 716. we let it sit ilding for a few minutes when done blowing to dry the carb from the engine heat. Otherwise too just when anything to just cover the carb so snow can't blow onto it..

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goatfarmer
My 2110 hasn't needed one with about 3 winters under it's belt. The muffler has an adjustable deflector,though,and I have it positioned so exhaust blows back over the carb area.

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D-17_Dave
Remember a lot of things may have bearing on whether you need this. Moister in the air, actual air temp, whitch way your blowing snow, etc. It seems to be a trial and error thing since most of us seem to have not gotten the kits when we got our blowers. Just some things to think about. You can always add something to help heat the carb if needed.

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KenK
I have the heat shields on both my blowing machines,HB-112 and HB-212.I made both shields out of scrap metal using only a drill, tin-snips and a big hose clamp.It only took about 15 minutes a piece to make,so the question is why not.^

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PhanDad
Like others said above, it all depends on conditions. Carb iceing is mainly about the amount of moisture in the air being drawn into the carb. When the gas vaporizes, the temperature drops in the venturi and the pressure drops. If the air is saturated or there's any free moisture in the incoming air, the moisture will freeze and slowly close off throat. The problem is usually the worst when the temperature is in the low 30's. The shield provides heat to keep the venturi area above freezing. So give it a try and if you find you're iceing up a bunch, build a shield. Or as other's said, let the tractor sit (or idle if it'll run) and wait for the residual engine heat to melt the ice.

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Al
HI, I used to run my old Squire 10 without one, but if the snow was "wet" it would freese on the throttle shaft on the outside of the carb and the carb couldn't open or close. Later I put a shield on and it ended the problem. When I ran without it, I would just spray the carb around the throttle shaft with WD40. This helped keep the ice from sticking. The place that needs it most is between the little stop arm with the idle stop screw and the carb body. The ice gets between the 2 and binds the shaft. A good WD treatment every 1/2 hr or so helps a lot. Al Eden

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MikeES
Briggs singles yes, Kohler no (did they make a cold weather kit for the Kohler singles?). Like Al, the carb on my HB212 and 3514H, do not freeze internally but the throttle linkage and governor linkage. This only happens to me when I am blowing snow the day after a big storm and the temperature is usually below 0. I try to get out right at the end of a storm before the extreme cold sets in. I have had no problems with our 917 (KT17 twin) and it does not have the snorkel kit.

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