Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
MPH

Differential Grease Easy Assy Method

Recommended Posts

MPH
Can't find anything in my B series servece manual about what type of grease should be used in the differential. What I cleaned out I believe was 35 year old wheel bearing grease with maybe some new added in globbs at some time. Seems pretty stiff for gear lubing too me. Thanks for any input Not sure what anyone else does but I remembered the springs I found inside the one on my B-112 when i took it apart years ago, so I removed 3 of the six outter bolts, replaced them with longer ones and just evenly unscrewed them. Worked so 'together like' I did the reverse when putting it together tonight and took a pic to share just in case someone fights it hard way yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
Marty, I just use standard lithium grease from my grease gun. Remember that those gears only turn when the tractor is making a turn or when one wheel is spinning. Not much motion, and not very fast, unless tractor is stuck with only one wheel spinning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MPH
Thanks Rod, That's what I was thinking. Don't have any syn grease right now and don't feel like starting the truck to go to town for some but since I plan on this being a lawn mower guess that doesn't matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
Marty, I had to use the long bolt method after shimming the springs on the one for my puller. Using the long bolts makes the assembly much easier.;) I use a little different approach than your picture indicates. I put the larger long bolts thru the outer housing half (side you have facing up), then block up the heads so that they all are against the housing. I then assemble all of the tubes, springs, and gears onto those bolts. I then place the other half of the housing onto the assembly and pull it together with the 1/4 inch bolts. This leaves the threaded portion of the large bolts sticking out the rear of the housing. I assemble the flange onto the torque tube and install the snap ring. Then i put the diff assembly onto the flange, and install the nuts on the back side of the flange. This may be a little backward to some people, but it has always worked for me. I've done about four of them this way. Whatever works!:D Another thing I like to do is install studs into the wheel flange while I have the diff apart. It makes changing wheels a lot easier, and I can use pretty chrome lug nuts. I use 7/16 fine thread bolts from the local hardware store for the studs. Just screw them in from the back side of the flange and torque them tightly. Older Chevy lug nuts will then fit.^ Here is a picture of the wheel, with studs and chrome lug nuts on my 61 Wards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MPH
My long bolts were tight enough in the flange only one tried to slide out when I pressed the top half on so all the gears and springs and tubes stayed in place good. Just as a side note to someone who is doing thier first, you have to make sure the gears are messing as you tighten down the two halves. Like the stud idea, I should do that while I'm at, don't have any old chevy's around though, if i force the ole Dodge into service at -55 today maybe I'll stop by NAPA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA
Marty, The reason I turn the bolts around is so that I can easily put the flange onto the axle while I can see and check the keys, and install the snap ring. I then take all the clearance out of the axle with the left side collar and can visually see that all the parts installed correctly and clearances are right before I install the diff. It is just my preference to do it that way. I know that most people install the diff as an entire assembly, then push the axke thru and install the snap ring. I just do it differently by preference. It works either way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thedaddycat
I've even done it by removing the left hub, then removing the axle shaft and differential out the right side as a unit. the differential will then slide off the left end of the axle shaft... I've posted pics of this procedure before, if I can find it again I'll post the link. Here, try this..... http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=18377

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    • PhanDad
    • Mach1martysr
    • John Dyer
  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Recent Status Updates

    • SonOfCreepfeed

      SonOfCreepfeed

      Thinkin' about this old girl.

      · 3 replies
    • Dean McFadden

      Dean McFadden

      Good morning peeps! I’m always searching for helpful information with my AC collection. Hope to find out new information and pass on my own experience in restoration. Here are some pics of my babies. I’m still looking for front rims for the 410 so yesterday I put the 310 wheels on took it for a drive. Working pretty good but still needs some carb work. Gotta get the 310 running next. Have a great day!😁
       

      · 1 reply
  • Adverts

×