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Simpleton7016

engine compatibility and storage

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Simpleton7016
I will soon have two very well running machines. A 7016H and a 912H both with 16 horse briggs. However, in these very classifieds, there is another 16 horse briggs available literally a few miles from my house. It is a horizontal shaft type 0151-01, code 7405 101. I am not yet knowledgeable enough to know what these numbers mean and I am certainly not qualified to determine if they will fit in either of my machines. So I defer to ya'll. Will this model engine drop right in either or both of my rigs? I don't really need a spare, but it wouldn't hurt.....it is located just a few miles from my home and the price is in a range where it would be feasible to keep a spare. Next question: assuming it is compatible, what is the best way to store it? It could sit for 6 months, a year or even a decade! I can store it in a heated basement. Fill it with oil I presume? What other steps are advisable for a potentially lengthy storage? Thanks in advance, Erik

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HubbardRA
That 16 B/S is more than likely a direct bolt in for the 7016H and could easily replace the Kohler in the 912H with minor modifications to throttle, fuel line, etc. For storage, drain all fuel out of the carb. Pull the plug out and squirt a little oil into the area around the valves, then put the plug back in. That is all I ever do. I do go out and roll the engines over by hand once every few months just to make sure the rings are not rusting in the bore, but have never really had that problem. I have several engines just sitting around. Try to store it in a fairly dry place, so that you don't have too much rust and corrosion.

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Chris727
It depends on whether the oil fill is built into the aluminum oil pan or not. The ones with the fill either on the top of the engine w/a long dipstick or on the side of the block will work just fine without modification, however if the oil fill is only on the pan itself, then the pan is too wide to fit between the frame rails on the 7016. The 912 should have wider rails but it may still have some fit issues. It could still be used if you bought another pan and drilled and tapped a hole on the block and installed a pipe w/dipstick but that is a pretty tricky process to get it in the right spot at the correct angle. It is possible that it has both oil fills. In that case all you would need is the other pan.

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MPH
If you think you'll forget to turn it over now and then like Rod does, pour a little STP in the plug hole instead of oil, it will stay stuck on longer. I also like to put clean oil in the crankcase before storeage. The code # tells me it was made in 1974--74 month of May --05, on the 10th day. don't remember what the last # in the code means, maybe plant made in or something. If the oil pan is a problem, just bolt it on your old oil pan.

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lboy1971
Don't cover it with a plastic bag or steel tub. I've seen people do that with push mowers to protect them during the winter then in the summer when they take the stuff off the sheetmetal is rusted to he** cause the plastic trapped moisture.

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Simpleton7016
Thanks for the tips. I may buy it just to experiment. I have never torn down an engine before. It is a runner, so I don't need to go too far, but I would like to clean it up and detail it for when one of my other 16's cr*ps out on me in a decade or so. :) Besides, with the amount of free time that I will have to spend on it, it may take a decade to detail! Once started, I will start a thread of all the problems I encounter and will post pictures as I humbly beg for everyone's advice! :)

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JeffNemes
For long term storage I also like to turn a single cylinder over by hand until you feel a bit of resistance. The piston should then on the compression stroke and both valves are seated in the block, making it almost impossible to get surface rust on them.

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PatrickE
I'd get it for sure, if you have time, take it apart, check it out, clean it up. If not, put some oil in the spark plug hole and give it a spin, put it in the basement. Before long you will be getting spare tractors, attatchments, etc. to go with it. It is a side effect of this disease we all have.

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D-17_Dave
Don't forget to coat the crankshaft exsposed ends with something oil based to prevent heavy rusting and drain the carb completely. Might even spray some silacon based light oil into the carb. so it doesn't get too dry and the gunk start flakeing off inside it.

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