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Simplicity 6216 not charging

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Hello: I have a 1987 6216 with a B&S 16hp. It has an alternator under the flywheel. Does this system have a voltage regulator? If so where is it located? Thanks, Paul

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Al
Hi, Most of these applications don't have a regulator. If you only have lights when the engine runs, It has a dual alternator. The stator is wound with 2 windings, One comes out and goes to the light switch and provides the electricity for the lights. This is AC. The other lead has a diode in it and goes to the iginition switch and to the battery. [This is DC] This charges the battery. The charge wire may have a bad diode in it or the stator may be bad. If it has what I think it has there will be a small rectangular plug with 2 wires coming out of it. If your lights work it means the magnets haven't come loose from the flywheel and tore up the stator coil. Next you should check the charging lead. It should have 12 volts on it when the key is on, because it should be connected to the battery then. Start the engine and run it wide open and the voltage should rise .2 volt or more maybe going to as high as 13.5 volts if the battery is well charged. If this don't happen unplug the plug and put your meter lead in the DC battery lead of the plug at the engine start the engine and you should see more than 12 volts DC with the engine reved up. If not shut the engine off, leave the plug DISCONNECTED and take an ohmmeter and measure from the DC lead in the engine plug and it should read open one way and nearly shorted with the meter leads reversed. [CAUTION NEVER NEVER NEVER TRY TO MEASURE RESISTANCE WITH AN OHMMETER ON ANY ITEM THAT HAS VOLTAGE ON IT!!!! IT WILL INSTANTLY TEAR THE HAND OFF THE METER AND DESTROY IT.] If you do not see this either the diode in the lead is bad or the lead coming down from the stator under the flywheel has gotten caught in the flywheel and is cut off, or the stator is burned out or open. To check the diode strip the insulated sleeving off behind the plug and leasure accross the diode measuureing the resistance both directions [reversing the leads] If the diode doesn't read low one way and high the other it is bad. I believe the diode is available from Briggs separately and you can solder a replacement in. Note you can have a bad diode and still have a bad stator. The last two things you will need to remove the flywheel to check. If you remove the flywheel be sure it gets tightened properly [I think 165 ft lbs] or it will shear the flywheel key and die as soon as you try to start it. Good luck, AL

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