Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
JimMcG

9020--Onan starter

Recommended Posts

JeffG
I'm currently in the same situation on one of my 4041's. Only, the starter does not work at all. It looks like the only way to gain access to the starter and solenoid is to lift the engine, unfortunately. "Not much room" is an understatement, there is "NO room"! Good luck, Jim. Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BenB
My 9020 Has a starter that sounds like it may not be fully engaging. The service manual says we need to remove the engine to access the starter(which is a lot of work.) My major concern is can the starters be rebuilt, or are there replacments available? Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sandy_Lake_Imp
Intermittent starter action can be caused by a gummed up starter drive or solenoid plunger but more likely due to low voltage being delivered to the solenoid. This can be overcome by wiring up an auxillary solenoid to put a full 12 volts to the starter solenoid signal terminal. It can be mounted alongside the right side of the battery & can't be seen with the hood closed. The engine doesn't have to be lifted for this fix.It does to clean the drive or plunger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Al
Hi, We repair a lot of these starters, some are beyond repair. Some parts we have. The most common failure is the front bushing. A lot of them have aluminum field coils and to replace the brushes you have to leave some of the copper leads that are bonded to the aluminum [with a special process] on to attach the new brushes to. I believe in most the field pole pieces are welded in and the fields cannot be replaced if they are bad. We also make and sell a kit that fixes the problem if the starter doesn't kick in all of the time. This kit fixes problems with solenoid actuated starters when the wiring or switches don't have adequate current carrying capacity to pull the solenoid in all of the time, like hot or cold etc. We have put several of these kits on skid loaders with Onans that have occasions when nothing happens when you turn the key to start. This problem is also common with Kohler Commands that have the selenoid actuated starters. The pull in current is about 29 amps to pull in these starters. The hold in current usually runs about 10 to 15 amps. In a lot of equipment the switches and wiring are too light to do this everytime especially when hot or very cold. Good luck, Al

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JimMcG
I have to remove and repair the starter which works only intermittently and from time to time. Is there any simple/easy way to get this part out or must I lift the engine? There does not seem much room to work in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JeffG
Jim, I got my starter repaired - it was all gummed up, etc. as was mentioned in the previous posts. Pulling the engine was pretty easy - I actually just tilted it up on the right side and slid it over to rest on the frame - enough to gain access to the starter / solenoid. I did all of this with my loader still attached (which is like working through monkey bars). My solenoid was also bad, and I replaced it with an auxiliary unit (as mentioned by SL Implement). I checked with Cummins (Onan) today and the starter for the CCKB is listed as "obsolete" and is "no longer available" (a common term associated with these tractors). Hence, a rebuild is your only option if you can't repair it yourself. I got a price for a rebuild - $38 labor + parts. Luckily it wasn't necessary. Good luck. Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KraigTM
Another thing to check for intermittant starter function is the safety interlocks. One of the switches, the one for the rear PTO was going bad on my AC620, a new switch fixed the problem. If you have an ohm meter it's pretty easy to test the switch, I new mine was going bad because I could wiggle the switch toggle and it would start. I also had to clean the old oil and dirt from the starter as "sandylakeimp" stated they will get gummed up and the starter won't work right. When you change the oil in these a little bit runs out from the filter right into the starter causing it to become gummed up. Floyd Stocker told me a trick to prevent the starter from getting gummed up, at each oil filter change spray a little bit of WD40 into the starter which is just barely visible with the oil filter removed. Works great. Kraig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KraigTM
JimMcG, actually pulling the engine on these isn't as bad as it first looks. Get a copy of the service manual. Also it's likely that if you do pull the engine you might find something that is about to go bad, loose bolts/nuts, cracked belt(s) to the drive shaft, grease zerks you didn't know about, wires that are worn, the engine cooling fins may be partially plugged with grease and dirt, cracked steering column support, these items were all found on mine when I pulled the engine to see why the starter wasn't working. Turned out to be the starter was just gummed up, later the switch, that I mention in my post above, went bad. In hind sight I'm glad that the starter gummed up and forced me to pull the engine, I found some things that would have been more serious if they had gone unfixed, also I learned a LOT about my tractor not to mention new admiration. Just a few thoughts. Best wishes. Kraig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KraigTM
Jeff, pulling the engine with the loader on is quite a feat, I removed my loader before pulling the engine. I love the loader but even filling the gas tank is a bit of a pain with it mounted, at least it is if your pouring from a 6 gallon can, the lift arms are in the wrong place. ;o) Kraig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×