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JCS

limited slip differential?

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JCS
I understand that the AC garden tractors are supposed to have limited slip differentials. However, I have never found that these really work. The wheel with the least traction always spins on slippery surfaces. My B-10 has the adjustable set screw on the rear hub to decrease the differential action on slippery surfaces (I have never used this), but my others (B-110 and 310) do not have this feature but are still supposed to have limited slip. Does anyone know how the limited slip is supposed to perform - are we supposed to witness a "locking differential" type reaction that one would find with limited slip rears in automobiles? If so, then what wears inside the differential that would cause the loss of perfomance? Thanks for your help, Colin

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Al
Hi, None of these are limited slip like cars. They have a spring pressing on some clutch disks in the differential or in the case of the Svoereign family the springs press against the pinion gears in the differential. Thes clutches only provide 30 to forty foot lbs of torque to the wheel with traction when the other wheel loses traction. This is why it is called "Controlled Traction", and in our marketing meetings we were cautioned to NOT refer to it as "Limited Slip". Good luck, Al

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Al
Colin, try the set screw on the B-10 it really can make a difference. Your B-110 must had the axle and hub changed as OEM this had the adjustable set screw also. It is possible that it still has the differential without the springs. I am a tractor puller and I have used both the differential with and without springs. I always spin both wheels, never just one. And the tractor goes straight down the track. You should see the Cub Cadets with their open diff. they can be all over the track. You could be getting more "controlled traction" than you think. My inside wheel will spin on sharp turns mowing but I have never spin one wheel climbing hills straight ahead. Is this the case with yours? Mike.

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swood
Al & Mike, Thank you for your information pertaining to the "controlled traction". My father used to use a '64 Landlord to plow snow and now uses the plow on a B-110 with hydraulic lift. We also use chains and 60lb (I think) wheel weights on the rear that I believe came off of a Simplicity wheel tractor. As I said, when plowing, the wheel with the least traction will spin. I think that this B-110 does not have the set screw hub, so from what Mike says, the axle and hub may have been replaced. Let's assume that the differential has the springs - can stronger springs be used? and - are the clutch disks made of the same material as automotive limited slip disks (which may be worn out in my rear)? Also, just to make sure that we are on the same page, I assume that the controlled traction differential is the pressed steel housing on the axle shaft that houses approximately 6 or so gears. Al, I read your discussion on the 26x12x12 tires. I have been considering putting a set like that, with weight on one of the tractors. Would you suggest using 16x7.5x8 tires on the front too? Thanks guys, Colin

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