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compostibles

How do I...

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compostibles
know when my deck needs servicing? I write this thinking that this question sounds dumb. Anyhow, it's the same AC 620, has the 60" deck. When I start up the deck, I don't hear any squealing, but it just sounds loud. I guess I'm used to the standard pushmower that you just hear the motor running. It has the access panel on top of the deck that has about 8-10 bolts. I just haven't made the time to check it out yet. How much play should be in the pulleys? If there is a problem with the bearings, what's involved in replacing them? There are grease zerks on top of the three pulleys that come through the top of the access panel that I have greased every time I've mowed, but I'm unsure of how well the previous owner maintained it. Another thing was the front wheels. When I make a sharp turn I notice there is a little bit of wobble. Is this an indication of wear that should be taken care of, or is that normal to see? I've read that after x# of hrs the front bearings should be repacked. Again, what's involved in this job? A multitude of thanks to all of you for your expertise. Jason an afterthought-my wife thought this tractor was a piece of junk when I brought it home. Now that it's running halfway decent, she thinks it's kind of sexy. (at least I like to think so)

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D-17_Dave
The wheel bearings are no big deal. Just a dirty job to pull the wheels and do it right. I installed zerk fittings on mine last time I had it apart so I cn hit the bearings with a touch of grease instead of pulling it all apart. A common place for wear on the front end is the pivot bolts for the front axle. Be prepared to remove the engine so you can access the bolts if you plan on doing anything with this problem. I've replaced several pivot bolts and welded up the worn places on the frame and axle to tighten this type of problem up. Slow but sometimes neccessary to remove the slack in a worn front end. If the deck is exceptionally noisy it could be a sign of worn bearings. Pull the deck out from under the tractor, remove the top cocers and check each bearing, top and bottom, for side play. Any appreciable movement sisde to side is enough to warrant changeing these bearings. They aren't tough to replace, just a little pricey. You were right to question how the deck was maintained before you. If you do have worn bearings you'll need to replace them before you ruin a spindal shaft. That really gets exspensive.

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Marty-MN
When you remove the deck after you have the belt and pins removed you can put blocks between the wheels and deck and back over it. when you go to mount it put planks on the rollers and drive on and over it. hook the cables first and use the lift to raise the deck to line up the pins in the mule drive.

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Craiger
So she thinks your tractor's sexy? Hmm....that should be a song! :D This is good info, guys. Thanks for the heads-up. I'll be sure to check the bearings on my AC610 when I overhaul the deck.

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HubbardRA
Craig, In general, the bearings are the primary cause of failure on most decks. If I spin a specific arbor by hand and it feels the least bit rough or makes a groaning or roaring of any type, I replace the bearings. I did a deck for my AC 716H about a year ago. It had two of the three arbors that made a little noise when I spun them by hand. The third was nice and smooth and quiet. I replaced all the bearings anyway, since I was taking it apart to paint it. Bearings usually run around $7 each, and there are two per arbor. Other than bearings, the other deck problem is rust. This is why many people do not use the covers on their decks. They want to prevent dirt and grass from building up under them and holding moisture that will rust out the deck. I know that I left the covers off of mine after seeing what was happening underneath them.

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Craiger
Thanks. I'm pretty familiar with bearing failures....and usually know when one's on it's last leg. I've worked in engineering in the electric motor business for 17 years and have seen my share of bearing failures.....in which the symptoms can be different in themselves based on how they fail. I've changed them out on my pool pump motors from time to time. I'm just not familiar enough with these machines to know much about their specific parts. Two per arbor, huh? Are the bearings used in these decks just standard ball bearings? Can the arbors be removed so the bearings can be changed out easily? I'm asking in case I'd need to bring them to work to press them out and put new ones in. I suppose I need to start ripping my tractor apart so I won't have to ask so many questions. LOL! Thanks again.

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HubbardRA
Yes the arbors can be removed. If you replace one, it must usually be pressed out. They use basically a standard bearing. They are still available from Simplicity, or you can get them from another manufacturer if you have their part number. I can't help with the part numbers for a 620, since I only have the smaller ones. On them the same bearings are used on the 42 and 48 inch mowers. Don't know if they are the same as for the PowerMax size tractors or not.

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